Sathya Sai Baba – A Thought For The Day – May 27th 2010

Sathya Sai Baba – A Thought For The Day – May 27th 2010

Prema Sai Baba

Prema Sai Baba


Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai Baba


Parthi Sai Baba

Parthi Sai Baba

Every one should lead their life so that no pain is caused by them to any living being. That is the supreme duty. Also, it is the duty of everyone who has had the chance of this human birth to spare a part of his/her energies occasionally for prayer, repetition of the Lord’s Name. One must devote oneself to a life of truth, righteousness, peace and good works which are of service to others. One must be afraid of doing acts that are harmful to others or deeds that are sinful, just as one is afraid to touch fire or disturb a cobra. One must have as much attachment and steadfastness in carrying out good works, in making others happy and in worshipping the Lord, as one now has in accumulating gold and riches. This is the Dharma (Right Action) of every being.
~ Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai “Thought for the day” as written at Prasanthi Nilayam
May 27th 2010 – Curtesy RadioSai

Sathya Sai Baba – A Thought For The Day – May 26th 2010

Sathya Sai Baba – A Thought For The Day – May 26th 2010

Sathya Sai Baba - A Thought For The Day

Sathya Sai Baba - A Thought For The Day

Everyone in the world desires victory. No one desires defeat. All crave for wealth, no one craves for poverty. But, how should one achieve victory and wealth? There is no need to undergo threefold struggle – physical, mental, intellectual – to achieve victory. Nor one need get perturbed or anxious or pine for wealth and prosperity. Take refuge in the Lord. Wield the bow of courage by holding your heart pure. That is enough. Victory and wealth will be yours. As you pursue victory and wealth, remind yourself that they are like your shadows, not substantial things in themselves. You cannot attain your shadow, even if you pursue it for a million years.
~ Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai “Thought for the day” as written at Prasanthi Nilayam
May 26th 2010 – Curtesy RadioSai

Sathya Sai Baba – A Thought For The Day – May 25th 2010

Sathya Sai Baba – A Thought For The Day – May 25th 2010

One has to be careful in matters relating to realization of God. Whatever inconveniences one may encounter, one must try to carry on one’s Sadhana (spiritual practice) without any break or modification in the discipline. One name that does not give any slightest feeling of dislike or disaffection should be selected for meditation and japa (repetition). One should not change the Name and the Form that one has loved and cherished and selected for repetition. Concentration is impossible if the Name is changed; the mind will not attain one-pointedness.
~ Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai “Thought for the day” as written at Prasanthi Nilayam
May 25th 2010 – Curtesy RadioSai

Passports – Lost And Found

Sathya Sai Baba - Passports Lost And Found

Sathya Sai Baba - Passports Lost And Found


Passports – Lost And Found

Each one of us is in the very same situation. Any little accomplishment, any little deed is always supported by the unseen hand of our Beloved Lord. When I look back into the face of time, I find a rainbow of memories flashing before me. There is one thing I never failed throughout. It is the presence of Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba, saturated by His Love. Every moment is filled with His omnipresence, omnipotence and omniscience. However it is for us to recognize this truth A couple of years ago, my parents along with my brother and I were taking a walk down the shopping lanes of London where we intended to make our purchases. On our way out one of the supermarkets, my father accidentally happened to put his hand into his hand baggage and to our dismay he found all our passports missing!

We were initially panic stricken, but our faith in Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba removed all our fears. We searched all around the place, retracting our steps but there was no sign of any of our passports. My father went down the lane making inquiries, but none of them brought us anywhere close to our passports. My father finally decided to register the problem with the police and started looking out for police officer.

As he proceeded, a young Englishman whom he saw for the first time came straight to him and said. “You must be looking for the lost and found department. Sir it is right over there,” and gave him some landmark. My father walked into the office of the British cops, as he had been directed to. As he opened the door of the lost and found department, he saw the officer in-charge just placing all our passports in a bag. “Thank God”, his exclamation was enough to inform the officer that those passports belong to us.

Nevertheless he looked at my father with a smile and asked, “Are these your passports?” The answer of my father in the affirmative seemed to delight the officer and on being asked how the passports landed there, he said. “Didn’t you meet anyone on the way up?”

My father said that there wasn’t any one he met. But the officer was not satisfied. He went on and said that the man who gave the passports just left a few seconds before my father came in and he said that he was the owner of the shop. My father just posed one last question on his way out with passports. “How did he look like?” The reply to the question was enough to throw us back in our seats and start thinking. Every single description matched the splendor of our Beloved Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba and we were deeply thankful for all that he had done for our family.

It was about nine months after that Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba appear in the dream of my father and confirmed His presence at London in a very unique way. The amount of concern Bhagavan has for each of us in much more than what the word concern literally means. The unfathomable ocean of His love goes far beyond our mind’s comprehension. There is a lot we students to learn from His actions, from His words and a lot to learn from His love.

We have to travel far beyond to be able to know actually how fortunate each of us is to be with Sathya Sai Baba. What we see of Him today is a very minute spectacle of what He actually is. Each one of us is on a long journey, “from us to ourselves” and we are immensely fortunate to have our goal. Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba as our guide. And on this journey, it is my constant prayer to Bhagavan that He be with us and guide us throughout so that I may be an instrument in His hands.

– From Talk given by Shri. Deepak a Student of Swami’s University

When A Mother’s Dream Came True

When A Mother’s Dream Came True
V. BALASUBRAMANIAN

If the art was mother’s gift, the title Bala Meera was given by Jawaharlal Nehru.

On a hot Sunday afternoon, Meera Grimes aka ‘Bala Meera’ Chandra receives you at the entrance of her spacious apartment on Poonamallee High Road, with a broad smile. For a moment, I remember those days when my family members would hurriedly complete the evening chores and rush to concerts and katha kalakshepams. One was child artist Bala Meera Chandra’s harikatha. I recall the discussions that would go on till late at night about her treatise on the subject that day, her charming looks, her abhinaya and her fantastic voice.

Over a hot cup of coffee, Bala Meera starts the conversation. “Harikatha encompasses storytelling, poetry, music, drama, dance and philosophy, and it is about God or about saints who had realised God. I owe it all to my mother Neela Balasubramaniam. She used to accompany my grandmother to Kadapa Lakshmi Amma to learn music, dance and harikatha. Lakshmi Amma is the first woman harikatha artist as far as I know. My grandmother and C. Saraswathi Bai provided her vocal support. Having lost her husband at an early age and due to the prevalent social stigma, Lakshmi Amma confined her performances to her house, and only women would be in attendance. My mother’s childhood dream of becoming a harikatha performer did not bear fruit. So, she was hell bent on making me one.”

Her arangetram

Bala Meera’s brothers were her accompanists and her cousins and aunts gave her vocal support. Her mother never missed her programmes.

Bala Meera’s voice sounds like the tinkle of a bell. She goes on “My mother taught music and dance to many children and as I watched them, it was but natural that I imbibed the art. Thuraiyur Rajagopala Sharma, an accomplished musician and harikatha exponent, volunteered to teach me the art of storytelling. His father Mahadeva Sharma had written a book on the various aspects of harikatha. The first piece I learnt was ‘Dhuruva Charithram’. My arangetram took place when I was 12. I was a student of Sarada Vidyalaya, T. Nagar, at that time. Offers started pouring in after that. Many sabhas, bhajan mandalis in the city and those in the districts provided plenty of opportunities. The training went on for about five years, and I learnt ‘Valli Kalyanam’, ‘Rukmini Kalyanam’ and many more pieces, expanding my repertoire in the process.”

Meeting a veteran

“Having heard about you, I wanted to see how a little girl in a skirt performs this art. That’s why I am here a day earlier. I am really proud of you and will help you hone your skills further,” was harikatha exponent Embar Vijayaraghavachariar’s comment when Bala Meera fell at his feet after her performance at Bangalore Ramani Ammal’s festival. Embar was to perform the next day. She reveres Embar a lot and values whatever she learnt from him.

A large photograph of a sanyasi in her drawing room attracts your attention. She explains, “That is Swami Remaji (Vaidyanathan) who was introduced to me by my mother when I had just finished SSLC. He taught me several bhajans of Surdas and Meerabai that he had set to music. He was an expert in all genres of music, be it Carnatic, Hindustani or Western classical. A nuclear physicist at the Cambridge University, he renounced life to propound a new philosophy. He was my spiritual guru. Before he passed away, he bequeathed to me all his writings running to several thousands of pages. I am in the process of bringing them out as a book.”

The prefix ‘Bala Meera’ got attached to her name when she performed Meera bhajans in the presence of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru in a village in Rajasthan. A large number of people had gathered there to donate gold equivalent to the weight of Nehruji for the National Defence Fund. “Patting my cheek and appreciating my performance, Nehruji said, ‘So you are the Bala Meera performing Meera bhajans.’ That was in 1963, and from then on I came to be known as ‘Bala Meera’ Chandra.”

She rates her harikatha performance on the 30 saints in 30 days at Sai Samaj, Mylapore, as one of her best. ‘Krishna Rathna Thrayam’ taught to her by Swami Remaji was another pet subject.

Performing alongside the women trinity M.S., MLV and DKP at a Tiruttani festival got her an opportunity to perform at The Music Academy, on the request of T.L. Venkatrama Iyer. Dr. V. Raghavan helped her get a scholarship from the Academy to learn Lalithopakyanam under the tutelage of Mahadeva Bhagavatar. In the process, she learnt many Dikshitar kritis.

Academic life

“As I was busy with my concerts, harikatha and dance programmes, I did B.A. privately. After obtaining a Diploma in music and dance, I went on to do my Masters at the University of Madras. That’s where I met John Grimes of the U.S., who was doing research. He was deeply into Indian philosophy and wanted to marry an Indian who would help him in his journey. That’s how we got married, with the blessings of the elders and Sri Sathya Sai Baba of whom he was an ardent devotee.” The bookshelf in their house is full of John’s books on Indian philosophy, including a treatise on Adi Sankara’s Viveka Choodamani.

Shifting base to the U.S. after her marriage, Bala Meera continued her performances there. Due to ill health, she cut down on the number of performances. Unable to bear her daughter’s ill health, her mother Neela passed away suddenly. “I never thought that I would be able to perform again. But by God’s Grace, I am still performing, but am limiting it to chambers and smaller crowds.”

Her book ‘Harikatha’, that covers Samartha Ramadas’ contribution to art of spiritual story telling, is what she considers her best contribution to this art. She says Samartha Ramadas is the father of harikatha for it was he who codified it logically into a structure. The spiritual guru of Chatrapathi Shivaji, he travelled to South India and established maths in Thanjavur when it was ruled by Shivaji’s step brother Ekoji. That’s how harikatha spread in the South.

Bala Meera also hails Thanjavur Krishna Bhagavathar, who was a violin vidwan for harikatha performances then, as the father of harikatha kalakshepam, for he adopted it to suit this part of the country. “Nonetheless, Samartha Ramadas’ ‘Dasa Bhodha’ is the ultimate book on harikatha and its grammar,” she says assertively.

As I take leave, “Harikatha is a sugar coated pill,” she sums up.

The Hindu Reference

USP Says Blood Drive A Success

USP Says Blood Drive A Success
Saturday, October 24, 2009

A large number of students and staff turned out for the University of the South Pacific’s blood drive at the Laucala Campus in Suva.

Organisers said they were surprised at the “strong” attendance. Sister Salaseini Boletawa of the USP medical centre said about 60 people turned up during the first four hours.

“The response from the university staff and students has been great and we expect about 20 to 30 more people to donate blood in the remaining hour,” she said.

The blood drive was held from midday till 5pm yesterday at the medical centre.

The medical centre also took advantage of the blood drive, and used video documentaries to educate donors on communicable, non-communicable and sexually transmitted diseases, and the preventative measures that could be taken.

The drive was joint effort between USP, the Fiji National Blood Service and the USP youth wing of Sathya Sai Service Organisation of Fiji.

Fiji Times Reference

India Floods – Government Of Karnataka Flood Website Launched

India Floods – Government Of Karnataka Flood Website Launched
Bangalore, Oct 11, DH News Service:

Chief Minister B S Yeddyurappa on Sunday launched an exclusive website — karunadu.gov.in/floodrelief2009/, which gives a detailed information about the recent flood fury.

It also has information about the relief and rehabilitation works the Government has taken up. The website will post the names of those who contribute for the relief works. It is connected to the official website of Karnataka Government — http://www.karnataka.gov.in

Meanwhile, donations for flood victims kept pouring in. As a contribution towards relief of flood victims, Sri Panduranga Vishnu Sahasranama Mandali, has transported and distributed 20,000 chapatis and bun packets.

The President of the International Federation of Karnataka Christian Associations (IFKCA), Bangalore, Ronald Colaco has donated a sum of Rs 10 lakh towards the CM’s relief fund.

Karnataka Medical Council has contributed Rs 1 lakh towards Chief Minister’s relief fund to help rehabilitate flood affected victims.

Basavanagudi Srinivasa BJP Mahila Morcha collected Rs 21,600 and donated it towards CM’s flood relief fund.

Karnataka State Tailor’s association contributed Rs. 1 lakh towards CM’ relief fund. Sri Sathya Sai Seva Organisations (founded by Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba), Karnataka have sent 5 truck loads of relief materials.

Federation of Karnataka Electricity Board Employee’s Union and Associations and all Escoms has contributed one-day’s salary and Rs 3 crore towards Chief Minister’s relief fund.

Karnataka Soaps and Detergents Limited have contributed Rs 50 lakh towards CM’s relief fund.

Deccan Herald Reference

Government Of Karnataka Flood Relief Website

Fighting The Smears – Robert Priddy’s Homoerotic Imaginations

Fighting The Smears – Robert Priddy’s Homoerotic Imaginations

Dear Friends And Fellow Readers,

This article is very important for several reasons. First, it documents the vicious behaviors of Ex-Devotees of Sathya Sai Baba (who often claim they are “credible”, “honest,” and “sincere” individuals). Secondly, this article is important because it documents the unbelievable extents that Ex-Devotees of Sathya Sai Baba will go in order to malign, defame and libel others. Lastly, this article is important because it reveals the dubious standards that Ex-Devotees use to determine what they consider “sexual abuse” and/or “sexual molestation”.

Since former followers of Sathya Sai Baba unremittingly and falsely accuse Gerald ‘Joe’ Moreno of being “molested sexually” by Sathya Sai Baba, Moreno’s story is unique and provides a revealing and telltale glimpse into the mindset, fanaticism and extremism that altogether exemplifies the Anti-Sathya-Sai-Baba Movement.

Robert Priddy (a caustic critic and defamer of Sathya Sai Baba who once hailed the Guru as God Incarnate and who once fervently Worshipped And Kissed The Guru’s Feet) wrote more blatant disinformation on his Anti-Baba blog about Gerald Joe Moreno (a Pro-Sai Activist).

The case is easily made that Robert Priddy is a bitter, vindictive and sexually-debauched defamer and propagator of disinformation against Gerald Joe Moreno (henceforth referred to as “Moreno”). Ex-Devotee’s willful, malicious and obsessive claims about Moreno being “molested sexually” by Sathya Sai Baba has undeniably cast a dark shadow of suspicion and doubt on their self-professed and alleged “credibility”, “honesty” and “sincerity”

Read The Full Story:

  1. Click Here To Read The Full Story On SaiSathyaSai.com
  2. Click Here To Read The Full Story On ‘Robert Priddy Exposed’ Blog

Spreading Divine Vibrations

Spreading Divine Vibrations

Sathya Sai Baba Yajna

Sathya Sai Baba Yajna


SACRED chants of Vedic Mantras along with offer of oblations in the sacred fire filled the air with spiritual vibrations when ceremonies were held to perform Yajnas for three days from 16th May to 18th May 2005 for the welfare of the world at Brindavan (Whitefield), Bangalore in the Divine Presence of Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba.

The venue of these ceremonies was Sai Ramesh Krishan Hall which was beautifully decorated with flowers, plantain and mango leaves. While four Yajna Kundas were set up on, the dais, one was set up below the dais in the Hall for the performance of these ceremonies. An altar was also set up on the dais where Kalashas (sacred vessels) were placed for worship by the priests. All the Yajnas were conducted by the priests from the Kollur Mookambika temple, Udipi and Shirdi Sai Temple, Bangalore.

On the first day, i.e., 16th May 2005, Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba came to Sai Ramesh Krishan Hall at 7.20 a.m. in a majestic procession comprising the Veda chanting group of students and the priests who carried the Poornakumbham led by Nadaswaram musicians. The entire Hall reverberated with sacred chants from the Vedas as the priests started making preparations for the conduct of Dhanvantari Homa that was scheduled for this morning. Before commencing the Yajna, the priests performed Ganesh Puja, Kalasha Puja and offered other traditional prayers. At 8.00 a.m., Bhagavan blessed the sacred fire which was placed in the Yajna Kunda by the priests amidst sacred chants. When the priests started the performance of the Yajna, Bhagavan sat in His chair near the Yajna Kunda and blessed the performance of the Yajna. The environment was surcharged with sacred vibrations as a group of priests seated near the Yajna Kunda engaged themselves in the performance of the Yajna and another group of priests seated on the dais chanted Vedic Mantras. Besides, the students of the Institute sang Bhajans and recited Mantras. Amidst sacred chants and Nadaswaram music, Poornahuti blessed by Bhagavan Baba was offered in the Yajna Kunda by the priests at 9.45 a.m. After this, the priests offered Arati to Bhagavan and received blessings from Him. Durga Suktam, Mantra Pushpam and other sacred chants continued till 11.00 a.m. when the ceremonies came to a happy conclusion. Prasadam was distributed to all in the end. Chanting of Vedic Mantras by the priests and students continued in the afternoon also. After the Vedic chants, there were Bhajans led by the students of the Institute. The programme in the afternoon concluded with offer of Arati to Bhagavan at 6.00 p.m. Prasadam was distributed to all in the afternoon also.

Sathya Sai Puja

Sathya Sai Puja


On the morning of 17th May 2005, Puja was started by the priests at 7.00 a.m. with the chanting of Vedic Mantras. Beautiful decorations were done on the dais with flowers of different colours. The altar where Kalashas were placed was also aesthetically decorated with fresh flowers. Three Yajna Kundas which had already been made on the left side of the dais were also decorated and sanctified by chanting of Mantras by the priests. Bhagavan Sai Baba came to the Hall at 7.45 a.m. and blessed the Ritwiks and the sacred Yajna fire. After receiving blessings from Bhagavan, fire was lit in all the three Yajna Kundas and groups of priests sat around each Yajna Kunda to perform Rudra Homa, Mrityunjaya Homa and Durga Homa simultaneously. While the priests offered oblations into the Yajna Kundas with chanting of Mantras, the Institute students recited Vedic chants and a group of ladies devotees chanted Lalita Sahasranama. The Yajnas continued up to 10.00 a.m. sanctifying the environment and filling the air with sacred vibrations of Divine Name. At the conclusion of the Yajnas, the priests offered Arati to Bhagavan and received blessings from Him. Bhagavan also distributed clothes to them. The morning programme came to a close with Arati to Bhagavan at 10.30 a.m. and distribution of Prasadam to all. Sudarshan Homa was performed on the afternoon of 17th May 2005. Before the start of the Yajna, there were Bhajans led by the Institute students from 4.00 to 4.30 p.m. Bhagavan came to Sai Ramesh Krishan Hall at 4.30 p.m. and blessed the priests to start the Yajna. Bhagavan Satya Sai Baba also blessed the sacred fire which was placed in the Yajna Kunda by the priests. Thereafter, the priests started Vedic chants appropriate for the performance of Sudarshan Homa and offered oblations into the Yajna Kunda. The students also continued to recite Vedic Mantras. At the conclusion of this sacred Yajna, Poornahuti blessed by Bhagavan was put into the Yajna fire at 8.30 p.m. amidst chanting of Mantras, sounding of the bell and sacred notes of Nadaswaram music. The programme concluded at 9.00 p.m. with offer of Mangalarati to Bhagavan.
Bhagavan Sri Sathya Baba

Bhagavan Sri Sathya Baba


The Yajna ceremonies started on the morning of 16th May 2005 concluded with the performance of Shatachandi Homa on the morning of 18th May 2005. A Yajna Kunda for this Yajna was specially constructed in Sai Ramesh Krishan Hall in front of the dais. Puja was started by the priests at 6.45 a.m. with prayer to Lord Ganesh. Sacred Yajna fire was lit amidst chanting of Vedic Mantras and auspicious Nadaswaram music at 7.15 a.m. With the blessings of Bhagavan, the priests started the performance of the Yajna by putting oblations into the sacred fire with the chanting of Durga Saptashati, Durga Suktam, Sri Suktam, Gayatri Mantra, Sai Gayatri, etc. Institute students and ladies devotees also joined the chanting of sacred Mantras. The Yajna continued in this way for nearly three hours. At 10.25 Poornahuti material blessed by Bhagavan was put into the Yajna fire amidst chanting of Vedic Mantras, Nadaswaram music and ringing of the Mandir bell. Chanting of Mantras continued for some time after this. At 10.50 a.m. Mangalarati was offered to Bhagavan by the priests. Bhagavan showered His blessings on them and distributed clothes to them. After the performance of the Yajna, renowned singers Smt. Parveen Sultana and her husband Ustad Dilshad Khan sang Bhajans in praise of Devi and Bhagavan Baba. The programme concluded with offer of Arati to Bhagavan Baba at 11.20 a.m. Prasadam was distributed to all in the end.

God And Sensitivity

Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai Baba


God And Sensitivity

Loving Sai Ram and greetings from Prashanti Nilayam.

Last week, there was a lot of media-hype here in India about a certain type of so-called sporting event. It had to do with a young boy named Budhia Singh of Orissa, age four, yes, four years only. And what was it that Budhia do that attracted so much attention? He walked non-stop for seven hours, in hot blazing sun – in May, the sun can be damn hot in India – covering a distance of sixty-five kilometres. Budhia walked from the sacred town Puri to Bhuvaneshwar, the State Capital.

Why on earth did Budhia do such a thing, instead of staying home, playing or watching TV or whatever? Because his father wanted his young son to become famous and have his name entered in the book of records. The foolish father was egged on by many, including a coach and a local establishment that compiles records – they and many others, obligingly supported the marathon walk. For the Media of course this was a welcome break, a ‘great’ human interest story, and a chance to lay off, at least for some time, from the seedy and sleazy news they usually keep themselves busy with. Oh yes, there were some rumblings from about half a dozen ‘human right activists,’ but on the whole, the Media and a good section of the public seemed to have enjoyed the ‘show’. To be up to date, we must mention that the National Human Rights Commission has just started enquiring into the whole affair. A panel of doctors have examined the child and expressed grave concern. They say young Budhia is undernourished, he is showing signs of stress, he may develop early rheumatism and also suffer renal failure.

Let us stand back and reflect on the whole affair. Did the boy gain anything? Absolutely not, except extreme exhaustion – what else can one expect when a small kid, a mere four years old, is made to walk non-stop for seven hours, a distance of 65 km, and that too in the hot sun? And you know what? We see from the photo that appeared in the newspaper showing Budhia approaching Bhuvaneshwar, that the child was not even wearing a cap!

Did the father gain anything? Perhaps he thought he did, but we wonder! The reason we mention all this is to focus on the rapid diminishing of human sensitivity. We do not wish to imply that sensitivity has altogether vanished from the human race; no, it has not. We just have to recall what happened at the time of the Tsunami, for example. Millions came forward to help, as also various social organisations and Governments. Mercifully, great calamities still produce a touching response in terms of aid and support. By God’s Grace, the spirit of the Good Samaritan is still alive, to a substantial extent. However, when it comes to so-called ‘routine and normal’ daily life, sensitivity often seems to take a back seat. Why is this so, and is it desirable? That is the question we now wish to consider.

Few realise that sensitivity has everything to do with God and Divine feelings. We often use the word compassion. Do we realise that if a person is insensitive, that person cannot feel compassion? Here it is necessary to refer to an incident, hardly known, that happened during the last days of October 2000. One afternoon, Sathya Sai Baba suddenly called all the teachers into the Bhajan Hall of the Mandir and started speaking to them. He said that he had recently read in the newspaper that a woman, unable to bear poverty and the fact that she could not feed her children, threw them all into a well and then committed suicide. When Swami was referring to this incident, His voice became chocked and He almost broke down. This was a totally new experience for many of those present, although they had been with Swami for years and years. For them it raised many questions like: ‘Swami often talks to us about equanimity, and yet here He is, breaking down! What does that mean’? Let us examine this question a bit.

Yes, God in human form HAS taught that man should treat pleasure and pain with composure, equanimity, etc., and remain unaffected by them. And yet here was God in human form, appearing to break down as ordinary mortals do. Was He not contradicting His own teachings? Superficially, it might seem so but let us consider another of His teachings ‘My Life is My Message’! So what’s the Message Sathya Sai Baba was giving on this occasion? He was saying effectively, ‘O man, is you Heart soft like butter and does it melt when you encounter suffering either by directly witnessing it or by hearing’. Or is your Heart hard like stone? Can you call yourself a human and let others cry in anguish? Is it not your duty to go to the help of people in distress? Was that not the lesson that Jesus taught through the famous parable of the Good Samaritan? On another occasion, Sri Sathya Sai Baba said: ‘If you do not feel the call of service at the sight of human distress, disease or injustice, how can you muster the determination and dedication needed to serve the Unseen, Inscrutable, and Mysterious God’?

If we take all these things together, then the message is loud and clear. We cannot claim to truly love God, if we fail to see Him in all living beings, and that includes of course fellow human beings. If we see God in others, especially those who are in distress, then we would not remain quiet; we would try and do at least something to relieve their pain. That really is what sensitivity is all about.

The question arises: ‘Why on earth are so many of us so insensitive’? Well, if you want the answer in a nutshell, it is our intense preoccupation with ourselves, our ambitions, our greed, our family, our this and our that. We do concede that some amount of attachment is inevitable for humans, but an excess of it.

Sensitivity is not always all about poverty, misery etc; there are many dimensions to it. Sensitivity also concerns how we relate to blind and handicapped people, how unwilling we are to hurt other people, how worried we are about exploitation and cruelty, not only to humans but indeed to all living beings; the list is long. When we look at the issue in a broader perspective, we find that both individuals and the societies they live in are constantly torn between two opposite forces. One force evokes goodness from within, while the other force urges indifference and indeed even selfishness. Thus, no one individual is completely heartless or totally selfish; the same applies to communities, nations and societies. The issue before us is: ‘On the average, what is the current index of sensitivity? Does it portend good for the future or bad?’ Different people would naturally have different perceptions, and we would like to place before you, our view of things.

If you take a crowded country like India, generally speaking, we tend to be quite indifferent to many of the problems that the underprivileged experience. For example, we do not seem to be bothered too much about the difficulties blind people face. In fact, some years ago, there was a most disgraceful incident when, during a rally of blind people in a big city, the rally was called to highlight many of the problems the blind face and the police carried out a lathi charge or a baton charge as they would say in the West. Imagine that! Police beating blind people, who had come out to highlight their problems and to protest!!

One can go on and on, but to be fair, it must be said that there are many, many concerned people also. For example, some years ago, there was the heart-warming story of a person who was working with spastic children, in Bangalore we believe. All these children were confined to the wheel chair. Yet, in spite of that handicap, they were motivated by this man to stage a play, the Ramayana; and the wonder of it was, that the man who produced the play was a Muslim. There are many such public-spirited people in this country who are quite vigorous in championing the cause of the slum dweller, tribals displaced by the construction of huge dams, and so on. But at the end of the day, what matters most is what the average person feels, and how sensitive the societies in which the person lives are.

In Japan, for example, the roads and even railway stations are so well laid out that blind and handicapped people can move fairly easily on sidewalks, get into trains etc., without anybody’s help. In America, there are any number of social groups that concern themselves very seriously with problems of suicide, alcoholism, drug addiction, depression, obesity etc., and go all out to help such people. Not only that; they are very pro-active in highlighting the issues involved and eliciting strong public support. And when there is strong public support, the government of the day has to respond by enacting laws that help handicapped and other people in substantial ways. Thus, if we are talking about the ‘average index of sensitivity’ in a community, it depends to a large extent on what the ordinary people feel about matters that ought to be of concern. By and large, it would seem that in the ‘advanced countries,’ there is greater social awareness about social problems and issues. In turn this is reflected in the way those societies deal with such matters.

OK, all this is fine; but what has it got to do with Sathya SaiBaba, His teachings etc? That is what we would like to consider next. There are two things we would like to mention as a preliminary. First is the line from the Gita that Swami often quotes. In that quote, Krishna says, “My Divinity pervades all and everything, and an aspect of My Divinity is to be found in all living beings.” In practical terms, it means that Swami is in all. Next, Swami says that recognising this immanent and latent Divinity within us, each of us must see the world and deal with it, being fully conscious of the Omnipresence of God. Let us examine what this means.

Let us start with a simple matter like greetings. When we greet a person, do we recall what Swami has said about it? He says, if you offer respect to a person, you are actually offering obeisance to the God within. Do we ever bother to recall that? If we did, we would never dare to abuse another person or speak rudely. For Swami has said that every abuse hurled at another ‘person/body’ ends up reaching God. Do we want to do that?

So the first lesson is that when relating to ‘others’, be it through feelings, thoughts, word or action, we must always remember that the ultimate destination of all these is really the Omnipresent God.

In other words, we must constantly feel that we are always dealing with God, though in worldly terms we might be dealing with Mr. X or Ms. Y. Once one is saturated with this feeling always, many things would instantly change, often without anybody spending one cent.

Just to highlight how important this matter is, let us take the issue of prisoners. Every country has laws and those who violate laws are thrown into prison. People seem to imagine that having laws, police, courts, and prisons, takes care of the problem of law and order. Does it? Active work by socially-conscious people has shown that it does not .

In Britain, for example, an expert Committee was alarmed to find that a huge number of young people get imprisoned under the present system. In the prison, these juveniles are often forced to live along with hardened criminals, and that changes their entire outlook. Thus, when they come out, they soon join the category of hardened criminals. The Committee asked: Is this good? Can we afford to make hardened criminals of young people? Should not Society do something to use the prison term to steer these young people so that when they come out, they live as good citizens and contribute to Society? Even from a monetary point of view, which is better for Society? To have more criminals and therefore more jails, security systems, etc., or better citizens?

What we have mentioned is but the tip of the iceberg. In today’s complex Society, there are millions of problems. However, if we think carefully, almost every one of them can be solved through Love, Compassion and Sensitivity. That is what Swami is telling us all the time, but are we listening? That is the question we want to leave you with this Sunday!

See you again next week. Till then, may Swami be with you and take care of you every single second.

Jai Sai Ram.
With Love and Regards
“Heart2Heart” Team