FUJIFILM’s Photo Archiving & Communications System (PACS) revolutionizes medical imaging

FUJIFILM’s Photo Archiving & Communications System (PACS) revolutionizes medical imaging
Submitted by editor on November 9, 2009 – 20:00

FUJIFILM India Pvt. Ltd., the wholly owned subsidiary of FUJIFILM Corporation, one of the largest medical systems company in the world, today announced that it has won the much coveted 2009 India excellence in Healthcare Award instituted by Frost & Sullivan. FUJIFILM was declared as the best multinational PACS Company of the year. FUJIFILM India also announced that it has bagged orders from 10 hospitals across the country for its revolutionary SYNAPSE brand of PACS system.

Large hospitals where SYNAPSE PACS has been implemented successfully include names of repute like Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences (SSSIHMS), Bangalore, Karnataka; Sagar Hospitals, Bangalore, Karnataka; Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences (SSSIHMS), Puttaparthi, Andhra Pradesh; Institute of Liver & Biliary Sciences (ILBS), Delhi; Primus Super Speciality Hospital, Delhi; Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Center, Delhi; and Pushpanjali Crosslay Hospital, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh.

According to Mr. Kenichi Tanaka, Managing Director, FUJIFILM India, “The success of SYNAPSE PACS further exemplifies FUJIFILM Corporation’s long term commitment in the healthcare arena. Buoyed by the response, we intend to launch new products & solutions such as Digital Radiography, FFDM, and 3D Image processing SW etc., into the Indian market in the days to come.”

“Medical images can be stored electronically and viewed on screens, so that doctors and other health professionals can access the information and compare it with previous images at the touch of a button. These images can be shared between health professionals across locations over an advanced communications system. It circumvents the delays & cancellations because of patient’s images not being available, lost or misplaced during transit, deterioration in quality over time etc.,” elucidates Mr. Suhas Pokale, Country General Manager, FUJIFILM India Pvt. Ltd.

For the past 100 years, film has been almost the exclusive medium for capturing, storing, and displaying radiographic images but it is a fixed medium with usually only one set of images available. FUJIFILM’s PACS technology allows for a near filmless process, with all of the flexibility of digital systems. It also eliminates all costs associated with hard film and releases valuable space currently used for storage.

For patients as well as the radiographer, even the amount of exposure to radiation gets reduced because fewer images need to be repeated using this technology. What’s more, patients do not have to wait for long for results which also ensures speedier move to the next point of treatment or discharge. Privacy is guaranteed as access to patient’s digital images is rights-based i.e. what they’ll be able to see shall depend on their role and involvement in patient’s care. For example, a consultant will be able to look at a patient’s digital images because they are a clinical care provider, whereas a receptionist may not be able to view clinical information. The images are stored in highly secure database systems.

Since the images are digital in nature, they are more reliable. Unlike film, there are no black spots on images due to bad light. FUJIFILM’s SYNAPSE PACS allows for flexible viewing with the ability to manipulate images on screen enabling better analysis. Moreover, instant access to historic images and patient records facilitates comparison of images (old and new) and thus the measuring of the effectiveness of treatment or the development of patient’s condition.

As a result of electronic requesting, radiographers have all the necessary information available to them in digitalized format. As a result, investigation is appropriate to the request and safer for the patient – misinterpretation of what is handwritten has become a thing of the past. Information only needs to be entered into the system once. This reduces some of the administrative tasks currently undertaken by radiographers, thereby freeing up time to focus on caring for the patient. The ability to manipulate images once they are taken means that radiographers can zoom in on areas of interest to ensure adequate information has been captured, which can then be passed on to the relevant clinician.

Besides, FUJIFILM’s SYNAPSE PACS contributes to a better working environment, as the lack of film processing will result in a quieter and chemical free workspace. Health and safety issues arising out of chemical processing get addressed automatically. It has been observed that patients feel more engaged and better informed when they can see their images on screen, leading to better quality consultations between them and the doctor. Not to forget the fact that PACS frees up valuable space within a hospital as storage rooms will no longer be needed for films. For the hospital, it results in substantial savings as patients are processed more quickly with fewer delays and cost of film and processing chemicals comes down to zero.

Web News Wire Reference

New DES More Effective To Reduce Restenosis Than First-Generation Stents: Dr Mitchell Krucoff

New DES More Effective To Reduce Restenosis Than First-Generation Stents: Dr Mitchell Krucoff
Monday, October 26, 2009 08:00 IST
Our Bureau, Bangalore

Newer drug eluting stents (DES) are proving to be significantly more effective and safer compared to the ‘first-generation’ drug eluting stents. DES is developed to reduce incidents of re-blockage or restenosis which occur with bare metal stents and almost all trials showed a marked reduction in restenosis rates. The ideal drug eluting stent is one which demonstrates high efficacy while maintaining excellent safety profile.

The latest stents made of polymer and steel are known for higher biocompatibility. These are thinner in appearance and more flexible. The lower doses of the drug are much preferred as a long treatment option for complex and difficult cases. Another big advantage is the negative side effects. The drug eluting stents reduced the need for a second intervention procedure by about 40 to 50 per cent compared to bare metal stents especially in complex cases where patients reported long blockages in diabetics and those having small blood vessels, according to Dr Mitchell Krucoff, interventional cardiology scientist and advisor to US FDA on medical devices.

Dr Krucoff who is in India to research on medicine, healing and spirituality at the Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences in Bangalore, said that over 75,000 patients are treated with drug eluting stents each year in India. The ideal drug eluting stent is one that has proven in large clinical trials to reduce the chances of reblockage, morbidity and mortality.

According to the recently concluded international congress of interventional cardiology, Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT), in San Francisco, three separate large randomized clinical studies showed that the new generation drug eluting stent Xience V was significantly more effective and safe than the first generation Taxus stent.

India will account for 60 per cent of the global heart disease burden in the next few years, reports a recent study by a team of Indian and Canadian researchers. Indians have a genetic disposition to heart disease and develop disease earlier in their life compared to western population. Already the country set to become the diabetes capital of the world and it is forecasted that it will also be known for the highest incidence of heart disease, said Dr Krucoff.

Due to the effectiveness of stents, angioplasty is becoming the preferred choice of treatment of patients with narrowing of the blood vessels in the heart. These devices have evolved over the last two decades beginning from specialized balloons mounted on catheters to treat the narrowing to bare metal stents to drug coated stents. In India, use of drug eluting stents have increased dramatically since their introduction in 2003.

Going by the economies of scale, DES is being preferred to by-pass surgery in terms of faster recovery and higher productivity for the patient to get back to work at quicker pace, he added.

Interventional cardiology is a super specialty and the need of the hour is adequate number of trained experts. If there are specialists who have ample experience, they are most-sought after experts to implant DES. The number of cath labs should also increase to help specialist carry out the procedure. India is far higher in terms of expertise and use of stents than China. The country has a growing patient population who need DES which are affordable, said Dr Krucoff.

Pharmabiz Reference

Also see:
Official Sathya Sai Baba Website
Sri Sathya Sai Medical Trust
Sri Sathya Sai Institute Of Higher Medical Sciences Whitefield
Sri Sathya Sai Institute Of Higher Medical Sciences Prasanthigram

USP Says Blood Drive A Success

USP Says Blood Drive A Success
Saturday, October 24, 2009

A large number of students and staff turned out for the University of the South Pacific’s blood drive at the Laucala Campus in Suva.

Organisers said they were surprised at the “strong” attendance. Sister Salaseini Boletawa of the USP medical centre said about 60 people turned up during the first four hours.

“The response from the university staff and students has been great and we expect about 20 to 30 more people to donate blood in the remaining hour,” she said.

The blood drive was held from midday till 5pm yesterday at the medical centre.

The medical centre also took advantage of the blood drive, and used video documentaries to educate donors on communicable, non-communicable and sexually transmitted diseases, and the preventative measures that could be taken.

The drive was joint effort between USP, the Fiji National Blood Service and the USP youth wing of Sathya Sai Service Organisation of Fiji.

Fiji Times Reference

Sathya Sai Organisation Of Australia In Fiji

Sathya Sai Organisation Of Australia In Fiji

Free checks draw crowd
By Mereseini Marau
Saturday, August 22, 2009

A TEAM of 32 doctors and nurses provided free medical service to people of Navua and surrounding areas at the Lomary Catholic Primary School on Thursday.

The team includes six general practitioners, four nurses, three dentists, one dental processor, two eye specialists, three pharmacists and two gynaecologists. They are members of Sathya Sai Organisation of Australia — a non-governmental organisation.

Team leader Dr Gunu Naker said they saw more than 3000 people at Tavua, Ba, Sigatoka and Navua.

“Many people come for eye check, blood pressure, heart check and skin rash,” Dr Naker said.

“Some problems we had were people didn’t bring their medication and glasses, so we are unable to offer much advice whether they should continue with that medication or start with the ones we give,” he said.

The main aim of the group was to provide free medical service to people in rural areas, who would otherwise could not go to hospital because they can’t pay for transportation.

“We met the Ministry of Health and they informed us which areas needed medical attention and we visited them.”

Ranadi Rokosalu had a free check at Lomary.

“I am happy because some of us from the interior find it hard to go to Suva for expert advice.”

The team was in Nadi yesterday.

Fiji Times Online Reference
Official Sathya Sai Baba Website

Sai camp provides free care
22-Aug-2009 11:25 AM

MORE than five hundred people of Nadi took advantage of a free medical camp set up by medical professionals associated with the Satya Sai Organization in Australia.

Team leader Doctor Gunu Naker who is a general practitioner based in Australia is in the country with a team of more than twenty highly trained specialists and general practitioner doctors.

Doctor Naker told Fiji Daily Post that the medical camp trip to Fiji which started last year is getting popular every year.

“Last year we were able to see over three thousand patients,” Doctor Naker said.

He said all medical services including specialist diagnosis given to patients were absolutely free.

“The Satya Sai Organization is not a religious but a spiritual organization and service to mankind is an absolute priority,” Doctor Naker said.

He said the medical wing of the SSO in Australia has a team of thirty medical professionals and there is a sister team based in New Zealand as well. “Our Kiwi counterparts have been coming over here for the past four years now and they mostly concentrate in Vanua Levu but they have spent two days in Viti Levu during their last visit as well,” Doctor Naker said.

He said the free medical camp this year had taken place following a medical conference which was held at Dr. Umanand Prasad Medical School based at the University of Fiji. “We were very fortunate to have had the company of the Honourable Minister for Health Dr. Neel Sharma in the conference as well.”

He said the medical conference was well attended by the medical fraternity and is gaining momentum each year.

“The conference and free medical camp will now be an ongoing thing because it was very important to have a good medical facility so that everyone benefits in the end.”

“Students from the school have been joining us as well ever since we started last year and it is nice to have them amongst us as they get to learn a lot from their experiences,” Doctor Naker said.

He also thanked the management and staff of Andrews Primary School for providing the venue for yesterday’s medical camp.

By SHALENDRA PRASAD

Fiji Daily Post Reference
Official Sathya Sai Baba Website

Free Medical Camps

Free Medical Camps
Tuesday, August 11, 2009

The Sathya Sai Service Organization of Fiji will undertake free medical services in the rural areas of Northern and Western Division with the assistance of medical volunteers and other personnel from New Zealand, Australia, including local practitioners.

Chairman of Sathya Sai Service Organization Dr Narendra Reddy says medical camps have been organized for villagers in Daku and Vunika and today they are conducting clinics in Tukavesi.

He says from this Friday the group will be providing services in the western division.

“This year we are having 2 big medical camps in 2 regions. One is being performed in Vanua Levu this week and there are 34 doctors in that group. 32 from New Zealand, 1 from Australia and I from Australia. The second group is coming later this week.”

He said the group of 32 Australian doctors will be concentrating largely on Viti Levu. He adds consultations will be provided by experienced medical personnel.

“These doctors come with all the different fields in medicine so they are gynecologists, dentists, physiotherapists, general practitioners and all the various fields in medicine. The group will consist of just about all the major needs of places. On that basis they come here.”

Dr Reddy says they have been organizing these free medical camps from 2005 and every year more than 4000 people benefit from this.

The Sai Medicare camps will be undertaken from 9.00am to 3.00pm daily.

Radio Fiji Reference

Official Sathya Sai Baba Website

It’s World Blood Donors Day on Sunday

It’s World Blood Donors Day on Sunday
Mansi Lavsi / DNASunday, June 14, 2009 13:45 IST

Ahmedabad: On the occasion of World Blood Donors’ Day, a number of programmes and drives will be held across the city on Sunday.

The Prathama Blood Centre has organised events across the city, including blood donation drives and vaccination programmes to be conducted at five venues — Dev Arc Mall, 10 Acre City Mall, Himalaya Mall, Prathama In-House and the Jain Digambar Samaj at Ghatlodia.

The events scheduled on Sunday include the launch of hepatitis-B vaccination and ‘beat anaemia’ programmes for regular blood donors. The Centre has organised a drawing competition for children on the theme of voluntary blood donation and a singing competition for the relatives of blood donors. There will be a talent show for the latter and a lucky draw will be held for regular blood donors.

Hepatitis-B vaccines will be administered and iron tablets will be distributed on Sunday as part of the launch of the two aforementioned programmes for the safety and health of blood donors. These will be conducted at the Prathama In-House.

The global theme for this World Blood Donor Day lays renewed emphasis on improving the safety and sufficiency of blood supplies through the achievement of 100 per cent voluntary non-remunerated donation of blood and blood components. Ahmedabad ranks first in the country among cities with the highest number of blood donors.

The Sri Sathya Sai Baba Seva organisation (founded by Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba), which holds around 100 camps every year in collaboration with Red Cross, will conduct drives at Azad Society, Vejalpur and Maninagar on Sunday. “World Blood Donors’ Day is of not much significance to us as we conduct camps on a weekly basis and encourage people to join the noble cause of donating blood,” a member of the organisation said.

DNA India Reference

Sathya Sai Baba Medical Institutions For Blood Drives

World Class Healthcare Absolutely Free

World Class Healthcare Absolutely Free
June 7th, 2009 – 1:00 pm ICT by IANS
By K. Jayaraman

Bangalore, June 7 (IANS) A super-speciality hospital here has redefined the approach to healthcare by providing world class treatment completely free.

Patients referred to Sri Satya Sai Institute for Higher Medical Sciences hospital do not have to come in with a credit card or a cheque book.

“Here we don’t charge for anything, whether it is a heart bypass, lung operation, or a brain surgery,” says Satyaranjandas Hegde, a top neurosurgeon and director of the 330-bed hospital. “In fact, we have no cashier or a billing section.”

Treatments, tests, medicines, food and hospital stay are all free, “and if some tests cannot be done here, we get them done outside at our cost,” says Hegde.

On an average day, surgeons here perform six neuro and seven heart surgeries. Together with laboratory tests, X-ray scans and outpatient procedures these are worth over Rs.5 million ($100,000) in commercial terms but done free, says Hegde, who quit his high paying job in another hospital because he did not like the “commercial culture” there.

He was not the only one to make the switch. Kolli Challam, head of anesthesia and critical care, left his flourishing practice in Abu Dhabi two years ago to join Hegde’s team.

Government dispensaries do offer free treatment for minor ailments but tertiary care always involves money, says Hegde. “It is a disaster for a poor family if one of its members requires brain or heart surgery. It means selling family jewels to meet hospital costs or just pray to god and hope for the best.”

For thousands of Indians – as well as patients from neighboring Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka – their god comes in the shape of the Sai hospital. Set up in 2001, it is run by a medical trust created by Sri Sathya Sai Baba, a spiritual leader with a global following.

Built with trust funds, the Rs.200 million that the hospital spends annually on salaries, medicine, equipment and maintenance come entirely from unsolicited donations from his devotees.

“The state government gave us land and the power supply for hospital is free,” Hegde said. “Companies give us medical equipments at discount and one computer firm installed Rs.10 million ($20,000)-worth hospital software at no cost.”

The hospital does not advertise to fill non-clinical positions. Skilled workers queue up to volunteer their services because of their faith in Sathya Sai Baba.

Those who man the gates, serve at the reception and counsel patients are all volunteers inspired by Baba’s philosophy that “seva,” or selfless service, is service to god. People wanting to offer ’seva’ are so many that there is a waiting list for volunteers, says Hegde. “We keep rotating them to give everyone a chance.”

Sai hospital is actually known as a “temple of healing” as it provides medicare in a spiritual ambiance devoid of commercialism, its employees say. “I can see god’s mission being carried out here,” said former president of India A.P.J. Abdul Kalam during a visit to the hospital in 2006. “The doctors and staff looked to me as angels.”

Free service does not mean compromising on quality or standards, Hegde points out. “Ours is as well equipped as, or better equipped than, corporate hospitals.”

The hospital, with highly qualified physicians and surgeons, attracts dozens of specialists from India and abroad because they are either devotees of Sathya Sai Baba or “infected by the desire to do seva”, says Hegde.

Sivaraman Yegyaraman, a practising cardiac electro physiologist in Stratford, New Jersey, is one such specialist who comes to Sai hospital twice a year at his own expense. “I had always wanted to place my medical training at the service of the under-privileged and Sai hospital presented me the opportunity,” he told IANS during his recent visit.

Another regular visitor, Ravindra Goyal, chairman of neurosciences at McLaren Regional Medical Center in Flint, Michigan, is a Sathya Sai Baba devotee. “Each trip to this facility charges and motivates me to apply the principle of ’selfless service’ to my work back in the US on my return,” he said.

What makes the Sai hospital unique? It is not just the state-of-the-art technology or high quality service but the spiritual ambiance pervading through the campus, says hospital manager Sri Krishna.

“It actually makes me feel I am entering a temple and not a hospital,” said Akella Chendrasekhar, medical director of Wyckoff Medical Center in New York. He was one of three specialists who came from the US spending their own money to conduct a workshop on ‘critical care medicine’ at the Sai hospital last week.

By redefining medical care Sai hospital has clearly shown it is certainly possible to provide the best treatment absolutely free, says Hegde. “There is no reason why this model cannot be replicated in other places in India and even abroad.”

The Indian Reference