Sri Sathya Sai – Love Is What We Seek

Sri Sathya Sai – Love Is What We Seek

EDEN Creative Studio’s musical Love Is What We Seek will be staged on Sept 19 and 20 at Pentas 1, KLPac in KL. The musical centres on a young photographer who is distraught with life after a series of disheartening events and much hardship.

The story follows his quest to trace the whereabouts of his long lost sister due to the separation of his parents and his ongoing conflict with his mother, whom he blames for the severance.

This musical revolves around love, the essential value in our lives, as advocated by spiritual leader Sathya Sai Baba.

It is produced in collaboration with the Seputih Choir under the baton of Stanley Cheong. Cheong has performed numerous times in India and was awarded a silver medal in the Songs For Religion Category and a bronze medal in the Mixed Choir category in the 1st Asian Choir Games in Jakarta in 2007.

Tickets are priced at RM20, RM50 and RM100. For details, call 03-4047 9000 or browse klpac.org.

The Star Reference

Sathya Sai Baba - Love Is What We Seek

Sathya Sai Baba - Love Is What We Seek

Love is What We Seek centres on a young photographer who was distraught with life after a series of disheartening events and much hardship. The story traces him on his quest to trace the whereabouts of his long lost sister due to the separation of his parents and his ongoing conflict with his mother whom he blamed for the severance.

This musical revolves around love, which is the essential value / ingredient in our lives as advocated by the great guru – Sathya Sai Baba – and will be brought to life by a group of enthusiastic performers.

Love is What We Seek aspires to put across this message – love begets love; life is love experienced” and hopes that this musical drama portrays Sathya Sai Baba’s teachings.

Produced in collaboration with the Seputih Choir, Love is What We Seek features many original music composed to express the purest human value of all – love.

The Seputih Choir under the baton of Stanley Cheong has performed in numerous performances in India and was awarded Silver Medal in the Songs for Religion Category and Bronze Medal in the Mixed Choir category during the 1st Asian Choir Games in Jakarta in 2007.

We welcome you to enjoy this musical drama as it will fill your heart with love…(KLPAC Reference)

Putting Love In Their Hearts

Putting Love In Their Hearts
Participants pledge to practise some virtue in Walk for Values
TRACEY TONG
METRO OTTAWA
June 01, 2009 5:03 a.m.

Ottawa residents take part in the seventh annual Walk for Values organized by the Sri Sathya Sai Baba Spiritual Centre of Ottawa-Carleton. The non-religious, non-political march, which began at Parliament Hill yesterday, was intended to raise awareness for the practice of human values.

Of the many walks that take place in the Ottawa community, one held downtown Sunday wasn’t looking for any money. But it was asking its participants to make a pledge.

The seventh annual Walk for Values — a non-political and non-religious event held on the city-proclaimed Walk for Values Day — asked its 100 participants to pledge to truth, right conduct, love, peace and non-violence for a year.

“This walk isn’t about money,” organizer Dipali Arun, who pledged to love and truth. “Money comes and goes. Morality comes and grows. Values are something that that don’t deplete. All you can do is grow them.”

The walk reaffirms the commitment to love, truth and peace, said Ottawa-Centre MPP Yasir Naqvi, who attended the event with Councillor Diane Deans.

“We’re trying to raise awareness of positive human values,” said walk spokeswoman Nina Mukerjee.

“Things are getting worse — there are so many problems plaguing us these days — bullying in school, gang wars in the streets. Each person here pledges to practice one value — like patience or optimism for the next year.”

Mukerjee said her pledge is to non-violence.

The walk is one of many that took place across the country Sunday in cities including Toronto and Regina, and in the U.S., Australia, Malaysia and India.

The Sri Sathya Sai Spiritual Centre of Ottawa-Carleton organized the event here, and people from as far as Montreal and Massena, N.Y., attended.

Balwant Bhaneja also pledged to a year of peace and non-violence.

“When you have peace on the outside, you also have peace on the inside,” said Bhaneja. He hopes the walk will help make Ottawa a better place.

Metro News Reference

Sathya Sai Education In Overseas Countries

Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai Baba


Sathya Sai Education In Overseas Countries
Dr. Pal Dhall

THE FORMAL EDUCATION SYSTEM developed over the last two hundred years in the West and now universally adopted is flawed. It fails to meet the real needs of the children, the family, the community or the nation. It was developed in the industrial age and its main objective was to secure economic well-being of nations. It promotes inequality and competition and divides the world into rich and poor nations. Such an education with its emphasis on technical and academic achievements does not promote holistic development of the child. Crime, drug addiction, depression, anxiety, family tensions, violence, delinquency and suicides are on the increase in all the countries of the world. The natural resources are being freely exploited and the planet is reaching non- sustainability. Educationists agree that most of these problems could be solved if we reform education to meet its two goals – development of character and academic excellence. But they have not been successful in reforming education to attain both these goals.

Philosophy of Sathya Sai Education
Sathya Sai educational institutions are based on the philosophy of education propounded by Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba. He gives equal importance to educational achievements and spirituality. He emphasises that education must give technical knowledge as well as skills to lead a balanced life.

The children must develop insight and understanding into their own life’s purpose. They must develop a lively social conscience and serve society, and develop a strong identity with their family and culture, nation and humanity. Sathya Sai Schools are based on these central features of Bhagavan’s philosophy. They aim at human excellence through developing all personality domains – physical, intellectual, emotional, social and spiritual, and not just the intellectual. These schools do not charge any fees. They follow the mainstream government curriculum. In these schools, the culture is suffused with human values of peace, love, truth, right conduct and non-violence. There are now dozens of Sathya Sai Schools in overseas countries. Many of these schools were started in the 90’s, and more and more are being established all the time. They are models of how human values can be integrated with the school curriculum to achieve the real aims of education – character development and academic excellence.

Institutes of Sathya Sai Education were established to manage and oversee standards in the Sathya Sai Schools, to train teachers in Education in Human Values (EHV) and to form professional links (or partnerships) with government or private schools for EHV. They have the task of developing EHV programmes appropriate to their local culture, to create awareness and guide government schools to establish such programmes. The question arises as to what extent the Sathya Sai Schools and Institutes have succeeded in their avowed aims and objectives. What is the impact of Sathya Sai Education?

Impact of EHV on Children
There is a global trend towards a materialistic culture based on technology and commerce. In this culture, television, rapid communication, mobile phones, internet, computers and CD players are important elements. Children’s main entertainment is from watching TV, and a significant part of their time is spent with the computer, isolated from others. A lot of values, language and role models are based on what they watch on the TV. The programmes often glorify violence and are sensual. Children are, in general, more lonely now because the size of the family is smaller (with fewer children), and neighbourhood where the children can play with others is less safe. Moreover, both the parents work away from home and the time spent with the family has decreased. As a result of all these trends, children now have less well-developed social and emotional skills. Their language is not anchored in values and their morality is weak. Many children have problems with concentration because they have become passive from watching too much television. The violence that they see on the television makes them fearful and indifferent to pain and suffering. In fact, they see war and violence as a part of everyday life from watching world events.

Sathya Sai Schools counteract these by giving children capacity of focus through silent sitting. Their discrimination is nurtured as also their problem-solving skills. Many techniques used in Sathya Sai Education give children good social and emotional skills and enhance their understanding of morality. Transformation of children is the main purpose of these schools.

People observe that when children from many schools are gathered together, those from Sathya Sai Schools are identifiably different. They are more disciplined, gentle, kind, friendly, and in general have better social skills. Parents are the first to notice their children’s transformation. Their children become more respectful, assume greater responsibilities, go to bed and rise early, do not watch as much television, are more attentive and focused, more interested in their studies, and more diligent with the tasks assigned to them. Several parents have commented that their children have become aware of wastage and are conscious of the need to recycle toys, clothes, paper and water. They say their prayers before eating and show respect for food. In a number of Sathya Sai Schools – Australia, Thailand, Africa, Latin American countries, Taiwan, parents have expressed delight to notice how their children are fresh and content when they come home from the school and believe that silent sitting, daily prayers, and vegetarianism promoted by the schools contribute to this. Some parents remark on the peace and harmony in the classrooms and have observed that the school atmosphere is conducive to learning; the teachers are dedicated, caring and good role models. Many parents move from other areas specifically to be close to a Sathya Sai School in order to enrol their children.

Experienced teachers who come to Sathya Sai Schools from government schools have noted that the children are eager to learn. They are loving, more friendly, caring and helpful to others. In the Australian Sathya Sai School, children were friendly even to a violent child, regarding him with affection. They are keen to look after the school, attending to cleanliness and tidiness and their honesty is obvious. In the Australian School when a newly enrolled child could not find his pencil, he said, “Someone has stolen my pencil”. The other children looked with amazement at him and one replied, “But no one steals in this school”. They take care not to damage books and computers. They are respectful towards the teacher. They trust the teachers more and are open in their communication, regarding the teacher as part of the family.

Similar results have also been seen in the government schools which have had EHV programmes introduced by the Sathya Sai Institutes. The Australian experience is a good example. In Australia, indigenous (Aboriginal) education has been a challenge to the government. Pouring in more and more money and creating better educational facilities did not provide a solution to the poor achievement levels, high dropout rates, and high educational failure in this community.

In one such school, a teacher noted that the attendance was poor, often only 5 or 6 children in a class of 30, and the children in the afternoon were not the same as the ones in the morning. There was hardly any discipline – the playground was a place of fights. The school had litter all over and the windows were broken. The children had poor social skills, and educationally the school was a failure.

A new principal appointed in the school invited the Australian Sathya Sai Institute to establish a partnership in EHV in this school. The teachers were enthusiastic about the Children programme and implemented it diligently. The results are nothing short of miraculous. Two years later, research by one of the teachers at the school for a thesis tracked the progress of the children and the school culture. He found that the school was a clean and tidy campus. The children were focused and interested in their studies. They had developed good social skills and were now able to resolve their own differences; schools fights were rare. To solve their differences they either negotiated with each other peacefully or took their problem to a teacher rather than resort to fights. Academic levels are now at par with other comparable schools.

Education Queensland (the Government Department of Education) has located a research unit in this school. The school principal was “The Queenslander of the Year” and the teacher who had acted as the human values education coordinator in this school, recognised for her work, was chosen as one of the seven teachers in the State to receive “Teacher of the Year” award. This school is now regarded as a model for Aboriginal education.

Another success story is the Sathya Sai U-Turn Training School in Australia. This school runs programmes for adolescents, boys and girls in grades 7, 8 and 9 who are identified as ‘at risk’ of educational failure by their own Government High School. The High School refers ‘at risk’ adolescents to the Sathya Sai U-Turn Training School. Here they are exposed to human values through a programme based on the teaching of Bhagavan through the word “WATCH”: watch your words, actions, thoughts, character and heart. The programme gives these adolescents social, emotional and moral skills, while the adolescents are engaged in blacksmithing, woodwork, leatherwork, sewing, painting and knitting. They work closely with the teachers. This builds their self- confidence and trust and they are transformed. To date almost all of the 43 ‘at risk’ adolescents who have attended the Sathya Sai U-Turn Training School in Australia have improved their educational performance. The local High School, the local Museum and the Municipal Council are now partners in this programme. Both the parents and the teachers recognise the U-Turn Training School as an institution to reclaim ‘at risk’ adolescents. Schools in Zambia, Thailand, Kenya, Nigeria, Malaysia and several Latin American countries have had similar experiences with EHV for adolescents ‘at risk’. There seems little doubt that EHV is an excellent method for reclaiming adolescents who are heading towards educational failure.

Impact on Education System
Because of the benefits both to normal and educationally challenged children, it is not surprising that EHV is being introduced or being contemplated for introduction into mainstream education in a number of countries. For example, in Kazakhstan, an Islamic country, EHV is being introduced widely into the government schools. In fact, it seems wherever there are favourable circumstances — open and receptive society, belief in God, general awareness of the need for values in education, generous donors (for Sai Schools) and good leadership in the Sai Organisation and Institutes — EHV is taking root and is being accepted by the government schools. Latin America is a good example. 40% of all Sathya Sai Schools are within Latin American countries. Eleven Sathya Sai Institutes are active in training teachers from government schools. In Chihuahua, with a population 1,25,000, EHV programme is being run in 35 schools. The Ministry of Education has set up its own Human Values Committee and is running its own courses in ethics and values. However, surveys by the local Sathya Sai Institute show that the teachers prefer the courses of the Institute as these are transformational.

In Thailand, the government regards the Sathya Sai School as a model of education for wide adoption. Following a seminar on Human Values in Education and Family in 2003 in Malaysia, almost 60 schools expressed interest in EHV programmes in their schools. In China, the government acknowledges the need for education reform to include an emphasis on values. Apparently, the widespread single child family there is producing a generation of self-centred children with poor social skills. These effects are being compounded by the rapid economic progress, which is heightening materialistic trends in that society. A Professor of Education in Guanzao is working on a phased introduction of EHV programmes into the public school system – 6 schools at a time. He has had good results and is enthusiastic about the future of EHV in China.

In Sri Lanka, the Sathya Sai Organisation and the Institute held a seminar with the educators from the local universities and officials from the Ministry of Education in 2004. The Institute regards EHV as the programme that would spearhead education reform in the country.

Impact on Parents
Parents become aware of Human Values through the newsletters and the parent link material that requests them to support their child by practising values at home. The community service that the children undertake through the school also influences the parents as also do the courses in human values for the parents that many Sathya Sai Schools run. In many Sathya Sai Schools, the children stage an annual event, a human values school play or a musical that the parents are invited to attend. In the Sathya Sai School in Australia, parents are actively involved in service to the school. Some take classes in art, yoga and music. The impact of all these activities is enormous. The parents become aware of their role in the values education of their child. Their relationships in the family improve and are spiritualised. In some cases, the children become values activists in the family, many times correcting even their parents.

Impact on the Community
Sathya Sai Schools are acting as the nuclei for creating better understanding in communities divided by ethnic, political and religious differences. In Fiji, the division between the Pacific Islanders and the Fijians of Indian descent has been deep for generations resulting in serious political turmoil including an attempted coup.

The Sathya Sai School in Fiji is located near a local village; 40% of the children at the school are of Islander descent and the rest are of Indian origin. The children learn both Hindi and Fijian and the parents from both ethnic groups have reached levels of understanding never seen before. The Prime Minister observed in the Parliament that if politicians could follow the example of the children and parents in the Sathya Sai School, then all their problems would be solved!

In the Kesaju Sathya Sai School in Kenya, the local Imams, suspicious of the “free education” objected to their children praying with children from other religions. The Imams were invited to hold prayers in the school. Now the Muslims are accepting prayers of other religions. This has been deeply unifying for the community. Similar experiences are reported from some of the Latin American countries where Catholic nuns have run EHV in Catholic Schools. They have been able to convince Mother Superior and the Bishops that they do not see conflict between Bhagavan’s and Christ’s teachings.

Sathya Sai Schools in some instances have become useful resources for the local communities. Kesaju Sathya Sai School is located in a semi-desert area with poor water supply, and in conditions of drought the community used to lose some of its cattle due to lack of water. Bhagavan gave instructions where a borehole should be dug for water. The result is abundant sweet water for the school to grow its own food, and enough to establish a farm. The school has built a trough so that the cattle can have water even in drought. Imagine the gratitude of the local community.

The African Institute in Zambia has developed a partnership with other agencies to bring water both to the school and to the local community in Ndola.

Almost all the Sathya Sal Institutes around the world are involved in training the local teachers in Human Values Education. The teachers who go through such programmes of the Institute realise that human values cannot be taught, but only demonstrated by the teachers by their own example. They have to practise the values and transform themselves, their schools and their communities.

Sathya Sai Schools and Institutes have not been long established. They are already having significant positive impact on their communities, governments and education systems. It seems highly likely that their impact will go on increasing and in another decade or so they will transform education and herald a new era in which human values will permeate all institutions and all human enterprises.

Reference: Sanathan Sarathi pgs 337-342 & 375, November 2005

The Passing Of Jaganaatha Sai – Son Of Datuk J. Jegathesan – Malaysia 2004

The Passing Of Jaganaatha Sai – Son Of Datuk J. Jegathesan – Malaysia 2004

Dear friends and fellow seekers, since Ex-Devotees Of Sathya Sai Baba (particularly Barry Pittard, Robert Priddy and Timothy Conway) continue to wage unremitting smear campaigns against the Sathya Sai Baba devotee Datuk J. Jegathesan (also spelled “Jagathesan” or “Jagadeeshan” or “Jagadeesan”) and have written several articles ridiculing, mocking and maliciously publicizing the tragic suicide of his son and the death of his wife, I am duplicating the following letter as a public reference to Sai Devotees who may have come across Anti-Baba articles regarding this matter:

My Dear Sai Family,

It is with totally uncalled tears in my eyes and heart (for Bhagavan Baba has said that “under no circumstances should we cry”), that I am conveying to all those who have worked with me for so many years in the leadership of the International Sai Organisation, about the passing away of my youngest son, in very hurting and sad tragic circumstances.

He was born on March 6th 1981 and Bhagavan Baba, in an interview I had with him, lovingly gave the name “Jaganaatha Sai”. Subsequently my son has had the grace of a number of personal contacts with Bhagavan, the latest being in Nov. 1996 when the family met Bhagavan about two weeks after the passing away of my dear wife Shanti.

At that time Jegan (as he was lovingly called by all) was about 16 years old. He was the pet of the family, tall, fair and good looking and was a special pet of his late mother.

The passing away of Shanti, in extraordinary and sudden circumstances had great impact on all, but especially our youngest child.

He went into a mild depression, and seemed to recover and performed well in his studies and at the age of 21 had graduated in IT and started working.

But in between all this, it was about a year ago that his depression began to manifest.

One day he became totally irrational, and began to find faults with me and members of the family and even his office staff and close friends. I myself only realized that something was seriously wrong when he accused me of interfering with his office and speaking to his boss against his work. This stunned me and that was when we decided that he needed psychiatric help.

He was referred for medical treatment at the psychiatric ward of the Malaysian University hospital. He was there for 13 days.

He was diagnosed as suffering from stress induced paranoid schizophrenia. He came out of that, and to give him a new environment, he went to Australia to further his studies (for an MBA), but returned within 2 months saying that was not for him.

His old company gladly took him back. He was in the meantime being treated for his psychological problems and was on regular medication.

Even before his 23rd Birthday (6th March), he was promoted to Supervisor and when i spoke to his manager about 2 weeks before his passing away, when he was admitted to hospital, he described Jegan as “brilliant” and someone with a great future in the company.

On his return from Australia he decided to stay away from home, but would visit regularly and join for family events. About three weeks ago he called me at about 2.30 a.m. and said “Papa, I would like to come back home, as I need my family to cope with the stress”. I welcomed him back and he came back that very morning, and settled in nicely.

About two weeks ago (on Thursday 12th Feb.) his elder sisters returned home in the late evening and saw him lying on the couch in the Living room, after he had gone jogging, (possibly for the first time in months). He did not respond to our call to “wake up and go to bed”.

However thinking it was just exhaustion combined with the drugs that had been prescribed for him, we let him sleep on the couch for the night. Next morning when I went to work he was still sleeping.

It was only at about 11am when my daughter called and said that he was still sleeping and they could not wake him up, that we decided to rush him to hospital. There he lay in virtual coma and under drips for 3 days and than he came out of the “sleep”.

The first day after the “awakening” he was totally irrational, but the next day he telephones me from the hospital, and talks as though nothing had happened.

When asked what had happened he told the doctors and us that he could not cope with his new promotion and “wanted to end it all”. He claimed that after his promotion he had only “about an hour sleep every night”. He had taken an overdose of pills after he had finished jogging, because he “just wanted to sleep”.

Now he himself laughed at the incident and told me “Papa, this will never happen again. This is a new Jaganaatha Sai”.

Anyway he was in hospital for about 10 days.

My meetings with the psychiatrists who were treating him assured me that he was recovering well and he was put under new medication.

He became a hero of soughts in the Ward, when he helped prevent another patient from trying to commit suicide or hurt himself by trying to cut his wrist with the sharp end of a paper clip.

On Thursday 26th Feb. the doctors said he could return home, but not before he was asked by the staff to be the master of ceremony of a party that the staff had put up for all, in conjunction with some holiday event. He even won a prize.

I took him home and that night there was a big family outing, dinner etc with his cousins and he was perfect.

On Friday 27th Feb., he came into my bedroom early and joined me in my morning prayers. This was for me a very extraordinary session.

He was so good that I showed him how I cleaned the prayer altar every morning so that in case he wanted to help, he could clean it in future.

Than he joined me in the garden and I showed him how I plucked Thulsi leaves and flower for prayers. I also showed him (and he did likewise) how I chewed Thulsi and Margosa leaves every morning as this was very healthy.

Than we prayed together and he sang a bhajan to Lord Subramaniam.

He than did LINGA ABISHEGAM on the Shivalingam that Baba had materialsed for me with instructions to offer the abishig water to sick people. He drank that water.

He also did abisheg on another lingam that had been gifted to him by some elders with 27 invocations of “Om Nama Shivaaya, Om Sai Ram”, the mantra that Bhagavan Baba had asked me to use when I did the Abishegam on the materaised Shivalingam.

Than he took Padanamaskaar from me and I placed Vhibuthi on his forehead and hugged and kissed his cheeks, assuring him of my Love.

When I left for office, he went over to my Aunts house in front of our home and joined his aunts (my cousins) who had come visiting from Overseas. In fact, they had told me to send him over for he should not be alone at home.

They than took him for Friday prayers to the Ganesha Temple where he participated fully and happily and with great devotion. They came back home for lunch and it was a very happy family gathering.

At 3.30 pm he told his aunts that he would like to go for a walk and he was so perfect that they thought nothing of it, but asked him to be back by 4.30 pm, as they did not want him out alone for so long. He insisted on the walk so they asked him to make it short.

At 5.00 pm he had not returned and they became concerned.

At about 5.30 p.m., I was still in the office with some meeting, when I receive a call from my daughter.

My son had at about 4.10p.m. (at best time estimates would have it from those who heard the impact), had jumped off a tall building less than half a mile away from my home and had died. He had taken his own life!

Why he would do this when there was no stress (at least as others perceived it), when he had enjoyed, for all intents, a perfect and happy day, only God will know.

There is a strange irony to these events which has been noted by many people.

On Tuesday 24th Feb at the weekly Bungsar Sai Centre Bhajan, I read out excerpts from Baba’s 2003 Christmas message. When I read that message I was doing it to comfort and give courage to some others in the Centre who had suffered some family tragedies.

This was what I read out:

“Whatever man experiences is the creation of the mind. Due to the illusion created by the mind, he establishes relationships and starts saying, my father, my mother, my wife, my children, etc. This illusion is the ultimate cause of his suffering. When man develops pure and unsullied love, he will not experience pain or suffering. Love for the physical body is false and transitory…

…Pleasure and pain are of your own making. They are not given by God. You are the cause of your suffering, none else…

…Worldly LOVE is transient; it cannot be called love at all. True love is immortal. You should cultivate such love. Physical body grows and decays.

How can you consider it to be real? In fact, nothing in this world is real.

Body attachment is the cause of delusion. Hence, gradually reduce your body attachment. This is the most important Sadhana you have to undertake.

…What is the use if you get drowned in delusion more and more with the advancement of age? Do not develop undue attachment to be body and material possessions.

Under any circumstances, do not shed tears of sorrow. You will be free from sorrow when you give up body attachment.”

Little did I realize that my Divine Father was preparing me for the events that would confront me on Friday 27th Feb. 04.

Bhagavan had said that we should never cry under any circumstances. I always try to uphold as best as I can all what Bhagavan says.

At the mortuary I maintained HIS instructions and gave comfort to the others who were crying.

But on Sat.28th during the funeral at home and at the crematorium I shamed the Avathar and myself by crying uncontrollably.

The only comfort that I could draw from the breach of this divine directive was the thought (as equally when I cried uncontrollably when my dear wife passed on), was the thought that “Rama cried when Sita was captured. Rama cried when Lakshmana was wounded in battle. Arjuna cried when his son was killed in battle”…so who am I, an ordinary aspirant of Divine devotion, not to cry. I cried but also resolved that I will continue to fulfill my Dharma and continue to contribute in my own small way to the work of the DIVINE MISSION OF THE AVATHAR. Please forgive me for taking your time with this long message.

Even as I write this I realize that this is one way I am psychologically consoling myself and trying to, by putting this narrative on paper, taking it from the frightening recording machine in my mind that seems to be constantly repeating the events of the last few days. Perhaps now the recording machine will stop, especially when I try to sleep.

To my Beloved Bhagavan and the leaders of the Prashanti council and all the leaders who make up the leadership of the International Sai Seva Organization, I give my assurance that the tragic events that has beset my life (my mother as you all know passed away on the 29th Nov. 03, the day I left Prashanti Nilayam for home… creating almost an identical situation as when my wife passed on, as I was returning from Prashanti in Nov. 1996) will in no way diminish my resolve to serve in the Divine Mission.

I am aware that some in Malaysia and elsewhere, knowing half truths and listening to rumors will judge me harshly for “losing a son” like this, when I have tried to motivate to the highest ideals thousands of Youth round the world to be ideal sons and daughters. If that happens than that is my fate.

If even the Avatar is judged harshly, by those who wish to judge and find faults, who am I to be spared this calumny.

In respect of the work of the Sai Organisation, if the Prashanti Council leadership wishes that I serve, as I have done in the past (and as I had indicated to brother Goldstein in Prashanti in Nov 03), I will do so.

Whatever happens, I will continue to serve in HIS Divine Mission in any small way I can in Malaysia or anywhere else in the world where people feel I can contribute to the Divine Mission of reviving Dharma.

Once again please forgive me for the length of this note and the details I have chosen to include.

Another reason, other than the personal psychological one, is that I do not want rumours to spread as they surely will. Some of you may be aware that the anti Sai forces used the passing away of my wife as part of their campaign, saying that she had committed suicide etc.

Though they were wrong that time, this time it will be true, but at least by making this incident transparent, hopefully it will forestall any other version.

I apologise to Bhagavan and all Sai Devotees and to the Sai Leadership if the anti Sai uses this as another tool in their vicious campaign.

With Love in my Heart to all!

Yours in SAI

Jega

As one can see, Jegathesan correctly foresaw the way in which Anti-Sai Activists would propagandize the death of his son (although critics ceaselessly boast & blather that they are conscientious, moral, honest, sincere and non-attacking)!

Also see:
Jagadeesan’s Letter About The Sathya Sai Baba Controversy
Interview With Datuk J. Jegathesan (discusses the death of his wife)
Response To Timothy Conway Regarding The Jegadeeshan Letter

He Made His Parents Cry

Dr DG Suresh Kumar

Dr DG Suresh Kumar


He Made His Parents Cry
2009/02/28

Social worker, playwright and management consultant Professor Dr G. Suresh Kumar is essentially a tropical medicine and parasitology professor from Universiti Malaya, with 11 awards to his name, writes SONIA RAMACHANDRAN.

He just won the Malaysian Toray Science and Technology Award last month for his 17 years of pioneering work in the field of Blastocystis.

Blastocystis is a protozoan parasite known to cause diarrhoea, stomach bloating and other gastro-intestinal symptoms.

He has also won numerous awards, including the Geneva International Innovation Gold Medal, for developing a diagnostic test for Blastocystis.

This is Professor Dr G. Suresh Kumar, a scientist, social worker, playwright and management consultant.

But in 1980, things did not look good for Suresh, who was studying at Victoria Institution in Kuala Lumpur.

He had failed his Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia examination, with very poor results in Mathematics and Chemistry. He sat for the examinations again, and failed.

“My career guidance counsellor told me never to take up science as my results were so poor. He said to try law, accountancy; any other course except science. Everyone else discouraged me. Some asked me to work and others said I was a total write-off.”

The turning point in his life came when he returned home one day and opened the door to his father P. Govind’s room.

“I saw him crying. I was the eldest in the family and he had always wanted me to be a doctor. I closed the door silently. I went out and did some soul- searching. I decided then that I would make sure that my father would have the opportunity to call me ‘doctor’.”

He joined Tunku Abdul Rahman College, did his diploma and bachelor’s in science, and joined the Institute for Medical Research.

“I was assigned as research assistant to Dr Mak Joon Wah. He was my parasitology teacher. He was the one who taught me about parasites. He was an inspiring figure and I became interested in the field.”

Dr Mak sent Suresh to do his postgraduate diploma in applied parasitology and entomology.

“The top student would receive a scholarship to do his master’s. I studied hard, landed the scholarship and did my master’s at Universiti Malaya. After that, I received another scholarship to do my PhD at the National University of Singapore.”

In Singapaore, Suresh did not just bury his nose in his books.

“I was involved in social work in the evenings. I taught in teen youth classes and conducted drama workshops. I begun to realise that the more I got involved in service work, the better I became in my field. Only when you serve and help others do your brains get activated.”

Then came the greatest moment of Suresh’s life: his parents came to attend his convocation.

“I think any child can do anything he wants, but to fulfil the ambition of your parents is the greatest satisfaction. That was a moment in eternity when my parents were sitting there in the convocation hall and I went to receive my scroll. I took my own sweet time to get the doctorate scroll because I wanted my parents to savour every moment. When I placed the scroll at their feet, they were in tears.”

Suresh, who is the deputy president of the Sathya Sai Baba Central Council of Malaysia, has written more than 70 sketches and plays which reflect values, unity and integration as well as the promotion of culture and tradition.

Why did he get involved in this?

“It gives you purpose and meaning. It gives much more depth to what life is all about. I have more than 180 publications and papers, and not one can I take with me when I die. No one really bothers what you believe in. What really matters is what are the consequences of that belief. No one up there will question where you came from but what will be asked is what have you done during your time on earth. What are your contributions?”

Suresh said his group was also working with the Unity, Culture, Arts and Heritage Ministry to organise an inter-religious youth camp next month.

How did he start writing plays?

“There was a drama competition and a group was staging this play. I saw that play and thought it could be improved. So I went home, took a paper and pen, and toyed with an idea. But I did not have the confidence to give it to the director, so I kept it in my pocket and went on to act in somebody else’s play. Somewhere along the way, the paper fell out of my pocket. The director picked it up, read it and said it was fantastic. They changed their script for mine.”

Suresh has also authored four management books.

So what is Suresh’s message?

“Nobody in this world is stupid or silly. No one in this world needs to feel that they are the underprivileged or marginalised. If a hapless individual like myself could pick himself up and do it, anybody can. Just believe in yourself. There are three simple formulas to follow: love and serve your parents, use every talent and skill to serve society and love all without differentiating between them.”

NST Reference

Time For A Break

Time For A Break

Ng And Siew Lean Kong

Ng And Siew Lean Kong

To some Malaysian families, Chinese New Year is not about traditional get-togethers or merrymaking. Rather, it’s the time to get away from the hustle and bustle and spend quality family time in a foreign destination, writes SHANTI GUNARATNAM

THE wind of change is blowing towards many age-old traditions, particularly spending the lunar new year in the homes of matriarchs and patriarchs.

Instead of returning home to spend Chinese New Year with their parents, in-laws and relatives, many are packing and heading for some exotic destinations.

In the case of Billy Fong, his idea of a good Chinese New Year holiday is to spend time in Puttaparthi, north Bangalore, India, with his spiritual guru, Sri Sathya Sai Baba.

But Fong, who owns his own seminar consulting firm, will not be alone on this annual trip.

His wife, two children and some 400 members of the various Sathya Sai Baba organisations will be joining him, as in the previous years.

In Puttaparthi, which is transformed into Chinatown during the festive season by the hundreds of Chinese who converge there from all over the world, is one big happy place to be during the lunar new year.

The whole place will be decorated with cherry blossoms, ang pow packets. lights and lanterns, filled with activities such dragon and lion dances, plays and dramas and fantastic vegetarian meals, all prepared by the devotees themselves.

“Puttaparthi is a wonderful place to be during Chinese New Year because of the activities there. We learn so much about the importance of filial piety and values from Sai Baba himself” says Fong.

“We never miss home and the lunar new year celebrations when we are in Puttaparthi.”

Sathya Sai Baba’s ashram in Puttaparthi, which has the capacity to house thousands of devotees, is called Prashanti Nilayam.

Fong and his family often spend three to four days in Puttaparthi before returning home to continue with the Chinese New Year festivities in Malaysia with their family and friends.

Stressing the importance of filial piety and values, Fong says he goes home to Penang one or two days before Chinese New Year to have the reunion dinner and spend the first day of the lunar year with his octogenarian father and siblings before leaving for India on the second day.

Spending time with his father, he says, is just as important as his trip to Puttaparthi.

“I leave for India only after fulfilling my obligations to my father and siblings.”

For printing shop proprietor Ng Kai Ling, it doesn’t make much of a difference if she misses her family’s reunion dinner or spending the first few days of the lunar new year with her relatives and friends.

More importantly, spending time with her husband and daughter in a faraway land is very crucial to her.

“The Chinese New Year holidays are the only time we can spend time together as a family,” says Ng, who this year will be going to Harbin in northeast China for eight days.

“At no other time during the year will my husband, daughter and I will be able to go away together because someone has to look after the business.

What fun will it be if we cannot get away for the holidays as a family, at least once a year. We really look forward to the Chinese New Year holidays.”

China is the family’s preferred holiday destination because they enjoy its culture, food, hospitality of the mainlanders and the shopping.

Ng and her family, who started travelling 10 years with their first trip to Disneyland in Los Angeles, have also gone on holidays to Japan, Korea, Myanmar, Thailand and numerous trips to China.

“The Chinese New year celebrations in China are no different from Malaysia. However, they only celebrate it on the first two days of the lunar instead of 15 days, unlike how it’s done in Malaysia.

We don’t feel guilty about not joining the reunion dinner because both sides of our families are in Kuala Lumpur. If we want to have reunion dinners, we can do it every weekend.”

The New Straights Time Online Reference

Paying Homage To A Holy Man

Paying Homage To A Holy Man
Monday December 15, 2008
By ANN TAN

SOME 1,000 devotees, many of whom were attired in white and saffron clothes, turned up at Dewan Sri Pinang in Penang to celebrate Sathya Sai Baba’s 83rd birthday in grand style recently.

Various activities were held to mark the occasion, including vedic chanting and bhajans, blood donation and the presentation of donations to six charitable organisations.

Sathya Sai Baba Birthday Celebrations In Penang

Picture Above: United by prayers – Devotees of different religious traditions lighting the kutuvilaku (traditional Indian light) in front of Sai Baba’s altar and chanting prayers in Tamil, Mandarin and English.

State executive councillor Phee Boon Poh, who wore a white kurta, spoke of his family’s association with Sai Baba and the guidance he received from the holy man in carrying out his duties to the state and the people.

“I did not believe in other religions apart from Buddhism until my father, the late Phee Joo Teik who was an ardent Sai Baba devotee, told me that all religions have the same aim which is to help people,” he said.

Phee, who is state Health, Welfare and Caring Society Committee chairman, later presented RM10,000 from a well-wisher to a representative of the Ramakrishna Ashrama.

He said the well-wisher had given him two cheques of RM10,000 each for charitable organisations.

Sri Sathya Sai Baba Centre Penang chairman V. V. Sarachandran said Phee’s family had, in their possession, a robe worn by Sai Baba.

He said the robe was presented by Sai Baba to Joo Teik in the early 1990s.

“His family has loaned this robe for display at the main altar during this celebration,” he said.

Sathya Sai Baba Birthday Celebrations Joy

Picture Above: Auspicious day – Penang Sathya Sai Baba Centre member Chee Lean Inn (in white) cutting her birthday cake together with several children. Chee, 83, shares the same birthday as Sai Baba.

The highlight of the evening was a musical presentation of Smaranam comprising an ensemble of talented musicians and singers.

The evening concluded with an hour of bhajan (devotional congregational singing) by devotees.

Reference