Merry Christmas From The SathyaSaiBaba Blog

Merry Christmas From The SathyaSaiBaba Blog

Merry Sai Christmas

Merry Sai Christmas

The three stages of Jesus’ life
Jesus was kaarana-janma, a Master born with a purpose, the mission of restoring love, charity and compassion in the heart of man. He had no attachment to the self, nor paid any heed to joy or sorrow, loss or gain. He had a heart that responded to the call of anguish, and he went about the land preaching the lesson of love. His life was a libation for the upliftment of humanity.

Like most seekers, he first searched for the Divine · in the objective world. But he soon realised that the world is a kaleidoscopic picture created by one’s own imagination, and sought to find God within himself. His stay in the Himaalayan monasteries in Kashmir and in other centres of eastern asceticism and philosophical inquiry, gave him greater awareness. From the attitude of being a Messenger of God, he could now call himself the Son of Clod. The bond of relationship increased: the ‘I’ was no more some distant light or entity; the light became a part of the “I.” With the body-consciousness predominant, he was a messenger. With the heart-consciousness in the ascendant, he-felt a greater nearness and dearness, and so the son-father bond seems natural at this stage.

Later as the Aathman-consciousness was established, Jesus could declare, “I and My Father are One.” The three stages may be described as: “I was in the Light,” “The Light was in me,” and “I am the light,” and may be compared to the Dhwaitha (dualism), Visishtaadhwaitha (qualified non-dualism) and Adhwaitha (non-dualism) stages as described in Vedhic philosophy. The final stage is the one when all duality has been shed. This is the essence of all religious disciplines and teachings.

Jesus’ original name was Isa
Jesus was honoured by the populace as Christ, for they found in his thoughts, words and deeds, no trace of ego. He had no envy or hatred, and was full of love and charity, humility and sympathy. Jesus’ original name was Isa which, when repeated, is Sai. Isa and Sai, both mean Ishwara (God), the Eternal Absolute, the Sath-Chith-Aanandha (Being-Awareness-Bliss). In the Tibetan manuscript, at the monastery where Isa spent some years, his name is written as Isha, which means the Lord of all living beings.

When Jesus proclaimed that he was the Messenger of God, he wanted to emphasise that every one is a messenger of God and has to speak, act and think like one. This is the true Karma- Kaanda (branch dealing with action and its reaction) of the Vedhas: saadhana (discipline) of karma (work), japa (prayer), seva (service) and dhyaana (meditation). When progress is furthered, Jesus asserted, each one can recognise all as Sons of God, Children of God, brothers and sisters of oneself, and so, deserving of worship. The Upaasana Kaanda (branch of Vedhas dealing with contemplation) is the scripture in Sanaathana Dharma (Eternal Universal Religion) for this stage. Finally, knowledge ripens into wisdom and’ the goal of Jnaana Kaanda (branch of Vedhas dealing with spiritual wisdom) is reached, when each one realises, “I and my Father are One.”

Second Coming Of Semantics VS Second Coming Of Jesus Christ aka Parousia aka Advent

Second Coming Of Semantics VS Second Coming Of Jesus Christ aka Parousia aka Advent
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When Tulsi Bloomed At Sai Baba’s Lotus Feet

Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai Baba


When Tulsi Bloomed At Sai Baba’s Lotus Feet

When my servants ask thee concerning Me, I am indeed close: I listen to the prayer of every suppliant when he calleth on Me. (The Quran II : 186)

Karim Sab, (67) shriveled and taciturn, sits every evening on the cuddapah black-stone bench in front of his dormitory. His posture denotes uncertainty, even loneliness, like an autumn-leaf about to be wind-blown; and he waits there till the sunlight turns yellow and makes dull the hills around him. The mid-November mist fills the somnolent air in Anantapur with a chilled invisibility.

As an inmate of the Home for the Aged in this Andhra town, Karim Sab’s life is uneventful. Nothing remarkable has come his way except that he has been a classmate of the one whom he calls “Sathya” — and whom the world now knows as Sathya Sai Baba.

Karim Sab informs this author that he has known BABA in the primary school, six decades ago. Delight ripples over his tired features as he recalls those happy days. His simple faith in Allah rules out questions about the ways of divinity. Calling these experiences as “jewels in the heart” he feels grateful and is content for the chance he has had.

“Even as children,” he tells the visitor, “we were certain that Baba was not like all of us, though He moved and played with us. Hazrat Mohammad Sahib must have been like this. And Lord Jesus Christ—Hazrat Ibraheem.”

When shown the photo of Baba he grows reminiscent: “As a child He was tiny for His age—yes, the same generous mouth and those large black eyes too were there. They sparkled like pools at sunset. Once we were free — it was a drill period — and Baba led us to play in the open space in front of the school building. We refused, of course.”

“Why?” enquires the visitor.

“The ground was hard with sharp stones and gravel. We were poor, no shoes for us. We said so, but He wouldn’t listen. ‘Come’ He insisted, ‘See, see, I can run.’ He started running over the crushed earth as if it was velvet. We hesitated looking suspiciously. And ah! wonder of wonders! Before our wide eyes it changed. Wherever His feet touched, a Tulsi plant sprang up immediately, just like that.”

Karim Sab stops, breathing heavily as if he has been reliving the moment. He mused:

“Yes, we looked on, as He ran lightly on the ground patch by patch, it turned to glowing green. The whole place was covered with Tulsi that sent a faint welcome smell! No, not the plant, but a low dense bushy type of growth. We ran to this carpet, rolled on it, stamped and wallowed till we were exhausted, and then we lay there, flat on our backs, panting for breath. The fresh aroma rose and covered us too, soothing like the touch of a warm blanket. Through its haziness we saw Him stand above us, hands folded behind, an unspeakable tenderness playing on lips.”

Karim Sab suddenly stops, overwhelmed by the intensity of his recollections. When questioned further he admits that he recalls that incredible event often. Now that the world has forgotten him, each evening he comes, sits on this bench and waits. Sometimes the newly sprouted Tulsi’s smell rises with the mists of the evening and enfolds him as an assurance, fervid yet cordial. “How often it happens?” comes the skeptical question. He is reluctant. Not everything can be demanded by an intruder. Yet he remains polite. “Yes …. not very often,” he says softly, “but yes Tulsi comes from nowhere and fills the whole air.”

—Prof. Zeba Bashiruddin (extracted from Sanathana Sarathi Nov 1992)

Reference

Alternate Views Of Jesus Christ In Art – Pictures – Society

Alternate Views Of Jesus Christ In Art – Pictures – Society
As an update to the former article entitled Jesus Photos – Sathya Sai Baba Crucifix – Sketches, Art, Pictures Of Jesus Christ, this blogged post will look at alternative artistic depictions of Jesus Christ.

Mandala Image Of The Shroud Of Turin Jesus’ Eyes:

Shroud Of Turin

Shroud Of Turin

Reflections On The Christian Jesus Of Nazereth:

Reflections On Jesus

Reflections On Jesus

A Different Perspective Of Jesus. He’s Looking Down, We Are Looking Up:

Looking Up

Looking Up

Father, Son & Holy Spirit – Indian Depiction Of Jesus Christ:

Indian Jesus

Indian Jesus

Black Jesus:

Black Jesus

Black Jesus

Black Jesus

Black Jesus

Race Of Jesus – Wikipedia (select quotes):

The race of Jesus has been a subject of debate since at least the 19th century. The physical appearance of Jesus of Nazareth was debated by theologians from early on in the history of Christianity, though with no explicit emphasis on race.

Different societies have depicted Jesus and most other biblical figures as their own ethnicity in their art; for example he is primarily white in the West, and black in Sub Saharan Africa. Such representations are not, in the modern day, usually intended to be historically accurate. The current dominant opinion among historians and scientists is that he most likely had olive skin, resembling modern-day persons of Middle Eastern descent. Others, however, have suggested other possible racial backgrounds. For some Christians the question is complicated by the belief that his birth was a unique miracle, an “incarnation in flesh of divine substance.”

By the Early Middle Ages the positive view of Jesus’ looks was bolstered by a number of descriptions of him purporting to date from his lifetime. Nicephorus quotes a description of him as tall and beautiful with fair wavy hair and dark eyebrows that met in the middle. He had an olive-tinted complexion, “the color of wheat.” One Publius Lentulus is supposed to have described him as perfectly beautiful in features, with “hazel-coloured” hair that flowed to his shoulders, and a forked beard. His eyes continually “change their color.” Epiphanius Monachus provides a similar description, in which Jesus is six feet tall, golden haired, with black eyebrows, light brown eyes and swarthy skin “like David’s.”

Not all depictions of Jesus are intended to literally represent how he is thought to have looked; many such representations are largely symbolic, spiritual, and personal, and the race chosen may be intended only to reflect, or more recently to contradict, local expectations. This may be true of both pictorial and cinematic portrayals.

Additionally, whether intended to be realistic or not, images of Jesus throughout history have almost always characterized him as being of the race of the artist or target audience, further complicating the task of determining Jesus’ race and sometimes leading to racial tensions. Categories of racial difference have also changed over time. While the German artist Albrecht Dürer often depicted Jesus as blond and the Spanish artist Velázquez depicted him as Mediterranean, there is no evidence that either of them would have interpreted these differences in terms of separate racial identities as they might be in modern America, in which “WASP” and Hispanic peoples are sometimes characterized as racially distinct. (Reference)

Also see:
Wallpaper Pictures Of Jesus – Gallery One
Wallpaper Pictures Of Jesus – Gallery Two
Wallpaper Pictures Of Jesus – Gallery Three
Jesus Photos – Drawings – Sketches – Art – Pictures Of Jesus Christ

Jesus Photos – Sai Baba Crucifix – Sketches, Art, Pictures Of Jesus Christ

Jesus Photos – Drawings – Sketches – Art – Pictures Of Jesus Christ

Jesus Sketch

Jesus Sketch

Jesus Sketches – Sketchings Of Jesus Christ
Pencil Sketches Of Jesus
Jesus Sketch Artist – Jean Keaton
Beautiful Jesus Christ Sketches

Real Jesus Photo

Real Jesus Photo

This Real Jesus Photograph above has an interesting and unusual story behind it. The story, as printed in the book “Shri Sathya Sai, The Yugavata”, by S.D. Kulkarni, page 134, is as follows:

“An English couple went to Puttaparthi (Sathya Sai Baba‘s place of residence in India). The husband had faith in Baba but the wife believed in Jesus Christ. Baba called them in for an interview. The husband had an automatic camera which started clicking by itself during the interview. When the couple went back to England and had the film developed, they got this picture of the face of Jesus.

On their next journey to Puttaparthi, Baba called them in for another interview and asked them whether they liked the picture. He then told them that this was a picture of Jesus Christ at the age of 28 or 29 when he left India to return to Jerusalem.”

Jesus Art

Jesus Art

Large Collection Of Jesus Christ Art
Christian Art Prints Of Jesus By Stephan Sawyer

Jesus Photo

Jesus Photo

Jesus Photographs – Google Search

Jesus Christ In Single Stroke Of Pen

Jesus Christ In Single Stroke Of Pen

Pictures of JesusPhotos of The ChristJesus ArtYeshua ArtworkSketches Of Jesus of NazarethJesuIsaYehoshuaChristosAnointed One

Sai Baba Crucifix

Sai Baba Crucifix

The crucifix was created by Sathya Sai Baba on a most auspicious day, Mahasivaratri. Baba had reached a decision to halt the yearly public viewing of the birth of the lingam as it flashes from his mouth and comes to rest in his hands, cushioned by a silk handkerchief. Although that public portion of the holy festival of Mahasivaratri was now terminated, nevertheless the lingam would be created by Baba each year again and again, for it is a principal sign by which we may know the Avathar. In respect to the oval, eggshaped lingam which Baba produces from within his body on Mahasivaratri night, he says, “It is not possible for you to understand the divine purpose and gauge its potential, or to know the significance of its manifestation. In order to bear witness to the fact that Divinity is among you, it becomes necessary for me to express this attitude of mine. Otherwise the atmosphere of hatred, greed, envy, cruelty, violence, and irreverence will overwhelm the good, the humble, and the pious. … it is the most fitting symbol of the Omnipresent, Omniscient, and Omnipotent Lord. Everything starts from it and everything is subsumed in it.”

We may also know the Avathar by the sixteen signs that accompany him: creation, preservation, dissolution, knowledge of incarnations, special Grace and the power to bestow it; each of these in the past, present, and future, thus totaling fifteen, with the sixteenth being Paramathma, the Divine, resident in the heart of each being. To these sixteen signs of the divine incarnation of the Avathar, Baba adds another sign, which he terms the most significant of all –divine love, universal and impersonal, yet personal.

The lingam has been seen by the writer a number of times. On the occasion of one Mahasivaratri night, I was sitting quite close to Sai Baba. When the moment came, I saw a flash of gold come from his mouth and saw the lingam caught in the silk handkerchief held by his hands. It was of gold. How an object that size came up Sri Baba’s throat cannot be explained. At another Mahasivaratri, the lingam was translucent, and there was a clearly visible flame in the center of the lingam.

The evening before the Mahasivaratri Day of 1973, we were told to be ready in the early morning for a trip; and that when the cars were loaded and ready, we would know the destination. Swami had decided that only a handful of people would be with him when the lingam became manifest.

Our destination was the Bandipur Game Sanctuary in Bandipur Forest, several hours away in Mysore State. We arrived at the Forest resthouse in the early afternoon. The next morning, we returned to our cars and, guided by the Forest people, took various winding roads, hoping to come upon one of the Forest’s wild elephant herds. As we moved through the trees and the open areas, in our minds we were hoping for a replay of the dramatic and fascinating encounter between Satya Sai Baba and a wild elephant herd which had taken place some years before when Swami and some devotees had made a holiday expedition to the Game Sanctuary. This time, however, the elephants remained in their secret places and not even one was seen. But the drive through the hills had another and more important objective. Swami intended to find a correct site where we could gather at dusk for the sacred event of the lingam birth. It was on this great and most mysterious occasion, unknown and beyond imagination to the world at large, that the crucifix came into being.

As we crossed a bridge above a sandy, dry riverbed, SaiBaba indicated that this would be the place. He said we would all return here just at dusk, and this we did. The cars halted at the side of the road, and we started to climb down the bank to the sandy river bottom. I was beside Baba. As we passed a bush, Swami broke off two twigs, placed them together, and asked me, “What is this, Hislop?”

“Well, Swami, it is a cross,” I answered. Baba then closed his fingers over the twigs and directed three somewhat slow breaths into his fist, between thumb and forefinger. Then he opened his hand to reveal a Christ figure crucified on a cross, and he gave it to me.

He said, “This shows Christ as he really was at the time he left his body, not as artists have imagined him or as historians have told about him. His stomach is pulled in and his ribs are all showing. He had no food for eight days.”

I looked at the crucifix, but found no words. Then Baba continued, “The cross is wood from the actual cross on which Christ was crucified. To find some of the wood after 2,000 years took a little time! The image is of Christ after he died. It is a dead face.”

I noticed something odd and asked, “Swami, what is that hole at the top of the cross?” Baba replied that the cross had been originally hung from a standard.

We continued down to the river bed, and Baba seated us in a rectangle, with himself at the head. It could be seen that Swami’s body was already in labor, and the group at once started singing bhajans (sacred songs of devotion and praise to Divinity). This continued without interruption until the lingam came out from Baba’s throat and was caught by him in a silk handkerchief. After the lingam had been admired by everyone, Swami put it aside. He then raised a small heap of sand in front of his knees, and with his finger sketched an outline on it. Then in a moment or two, he dug his hand into the sand and brought forth a silver flask filled with amrith. Then he moved his hand and created a small silver cup. Everyone, from his hand, was then given a portion of the amrith, nectar of the Gods. How delicate and delicious was the taste! It is unique. There is no other taste to compare it to.

Within a few weeks we were back at our home in Mexico and were soon to witness an amazing series of events in relation to the crucifix. The cross is so small that the details on the figure of Christ escape the eye. A friend, Walter, came down to our home and took some color photographs of the crucifix. The over-all length of the Christ figure is only one inch, and Walter was to make some enlargements to bring out the detail. When he mailed us a sample of the prints, my wife and I were astounded. I wrote to him and said that if the pictures were seen around the world, they would create an art sensation. I am sure it is the greatest sculpture of Christ ever made. In my estimation, it is the most extraordinary object Sri Sathya Sai has ever created for the joy of his devotees.

A few weeks later, Walter and his wife returned with color enlargements of the cross. These, along with the actual cross, were spread out on the dining room table, next to large french windows overlooking the sea. The time was about 5 p.m. The details revealed by the photographic enlargements were so extraordinary that all persons present were concentrating on this amazing vision of Christ, and on the mystery and wonder of Sri Bhagavan. On this afternoon, the sky along the Mexican coast was clear and peaceful. But suddenly, without any warning, there was a loud crash of thunder, and as our eyes turned to the windows, lightning flashed from a dark cloud where a moment before there had been only clear sky. A violent wind rushed through the house, causing windows and doors to open and shut with such force that glass was in danger of shattering. The curtains were flying in all directions. We were much startled by this turn of events, but my wife at once said, “It is 5 p.m., the time Christ died on the cross, and what is now happening is described in the Bible.” She later brought a Bible and we looked until we found the pertinent paragraph, which said that at the moment Christ gave up His life, a violent storm arose with lightning and thunder, and winds rent the curtains of the temple. We concluded that we had witnessed a wonder totally beyond our power of imagination. Before our eyes had occured nothing less than a recapitulation of events related to the crucifixion. The following day newspapers in San Diego carried a brief story commenting on the sudden and mysterious storm that had arisen without warning on the Mexican coast, near Ensenada. We and our friends concluded that this recapitulation of an event which had taken place some 2,000 years ago upon the crucifixion of Christ implied a great power connected in some way with that small cross and Christ figure materialized by Baba.

A year or so later, I sent a description of the event to Dr. Eruch B. Fanibunda for his book, Vision of the Divine. He showed the memo to Baba. After reading the memo, Baba said that the event occurred as described and that the significance attributed to it was correct.

It might be thought that the story of the cross was now complete, but there is still a sequel. I 1975, I made an unannounced trip to India to consult with Baba about arrangements for a visit to America that we hoped he would undertake. Swami had not been informed of my visit and was away on a tour when I arrived. On that day, he was having lunch with a few senior devotees and he said, “Hislop arrived in Bangalore just now and is waiting.”

One of the men at the table (who later told me of the scene) remarked, “You made a crucifix for him.”

SathyaSaiBaba replied, “Yes, I made it for him. And when I went to look for the wood, every particle of the cross had disintegrated and had returned to the elements. I reached out to the elements and reconstituted sufficient material for a small cross. Very seldom does Swami interfere with Nature, but occasionally, for a devotee, it will be done.”

Also see:
Wallpaper Pictures Of Jesus – Gallery One
Wallpaper Pictures Of Jesus – Gallery Two
Wallpaper Pictures Of Jesus – Gallery Three
Alternate Views Of Jesus Christ In Art – Pictures – Society