FUJIFILM’s Photo Archiving & Communications System (PACS) revolutionizes medical imaging

FUJIFILM’s Photo Archiving & Communications System (PACS) revolutionizes medical imaging
Submitted by editor on November 9, 2009 – 20:00

FUJIFILM India Pvt. Ltd., the wholly owned subsidiary of FUJIFILM Corporation, one of the largest medical systems company in the world, today announced that it has won the much coveted 2009 India excellence in Healthcare Award instituted by Frost & Sullivan. FUJIFILM was declared as the best multinational PACS Company of the year. FUJIFILM India also announced that it has bagged orders from 10 hospitals across the country for its revolutionary SYNAPSE brand of PACS system.

Large hospitals where SYNAPSE PACS has been implemented successfully include names of repute like Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences (SSSIHMS), Bangalore, Karnataka; Sagar Hospitals, Bangalore, Karnataka; Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences (SSSIHMS), Puttaparthi, Andhra Pradesh; Institute of Liver & Biliary Sciences (ILBS), Delhi; Primus Super Speciality Hospital, Delhi; Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Center, Delhi; and Pushpanjali Crosslay Hospital, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh.

According to Mr. Kenichi Tanaka, Managing Director, FUJIFILM India, “The success of SYNAPSE PACS further exemplifies FUJIFILM Corporation’s long term commitment in the healthcare arena. Buoyed by the response, we intend to launch new products & solutions such as Digital Radiography, FFDM, and 3D Image processing SW etc., into the Indian market in the days to come.”

“Medical images can be stored electronically and viewed on screens, so that doctors and other health professionals can access the information and compare it with previous images at the touch of a button. These images can be shared between health professionals across locations over an advanced communications system. It circumvents the delays & cancellations because of patient’s images not being available, lost or misplaced during transit, deterioration in quality over time etc.,” elucidates Mr. Suhas Pokale, Country General Manager, FUJIFILM India Pvt. Ltd.

For the past 100 years, film has been almost the exclusive medium for capturing, storing, and displaying radiographic images but it is a fixed medium with usually only one set of images available. FUJIFILM’s PACS technology allows for a near filmless process, with all of the flexibility of digital systems. It also eliminates all costs associated with hard film and releases valuable space currently used for storage.

For patients as well as the radiographer, even the amount of exposure to radiation gets reduced because fewer images need to be repeated using this technology. What’s more, patients do not have to wait for long for results which also ensures speedier move to the next point of treatment or discharge. Privacy is guaranteed as access to patient’s digital images is rights-based i.e. what they’ll be able to see shall depend on their role and involvement in patient’s care. For example, a consultant will be able to look at a patient’s digital images because they are a clinical care provider, whereas a receptionist may not be able to view clinical information. The images are stored in highly secure database systems.

Since the images are digital in nature, they are more reliable. Unlike film, there are no black spots on images due to bad light. FUJIFILM’s SYNAPSE PACS allows for flexible viewing with the ability to manipulate images on screen enabling better analysis. Moreover, instant access to historic images and patient records facilitates comparison of images (old and new) and thus the measuring of the effectiveness of treatment or the development of patient’s condition.

As a result of electronic requesting, radiographers have all the necessary information available to them in digitalized format. As a result, investigation is appropriate to the request and safer for the patient – misinterpretation of what is handwritten has become a thing of the past. Information only needs to be entered into the system once. This reduces some of the administrative tasks currently undertaken by radiographers, thereby freeing up time to focus on caring for the patient. The ability to manipulate images once they are taken means that radiographers can zoom in on areas of interest to ensure adequate information has been captured, which can then be passed on to the relevant clinician.

Besides, FUJIFILM’s SYNAPSE PACS contributes to a better working environment, as the lack of film processing will result in a quieter and chemical free workspace. Health and safety issues arising out of chemical processing get addressed automatically. It has been observed that patients feel more engaged and better informed when they can see their images on screen, leading to better quality consultations between them and the doctor. Not to forget the fact that PACS frees up valuable space within a hospital as storage rooms will no longer be needed for films. For the hospital, it results in substantial savings as patients are processed more quickly with fewer delays and cost of film and processing chemicals comes down to zero.

Web News Wire Reference

World Class Healthcare Absolutely Free

World Class Healthcare Absolutely Free
June 7th, 2009 – 1:00 pm ICT by IANS
By K. Jayaraman

Bangalore, June 7 (IANS) A super-speciality hospital here has redefined the approach to healthcare by providing world class treatment completely free.

Patients referred to Sri Satya Sai Institute for Higher Medical Sciences hospital do not have to come in with a credit card or a cheque book.

“Here we don’t charge for anything, whether it is a heart bypass, lung operation, or a brain surgery,” says Satyaranjandas Hegde, a top neurosurgeon and director of the 330-bed hospital. “In fact, we have no cashier or a billing section.”

Treatments, tests, medicines, food and hospital stay are all free, “and if some tests cannot be done here, we get them done outside at our cost,” says Hegde.

On an average day, surgeons here perform six neuro and seven heart surgeries. Together with laboratory tests, X-ray scans and outpatient procedures these are worth over Rs.5 million ($100,000) in commercial terms but done free, says Hegde, who quit his high paying job in another hospital because he did not like the “commercial culture” there.

He was not the only one to make the switch. Kolli Challam, head of anesthesia and critical care, left his flourishing practice in Abu Dhabi two years ago to join Hegde’s team.

Government dispensaries do offer free treatment for minor ailments but tertiary care always involves money, says Hegde. “It is a disaster for a poor family if one of its members requires brain or heart surgery. It means selling family jewels to meet hospital costs or just pray to god and hope for the best.”

For thousands of Indians – as well as patients from neighboring Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka – their god comes in the shape of the Sai hospital. Set up in 2001, it is run by a medical trust created by Sri Sathya Sai Baba, a spiritual leader with a global following.

Built with trust funds, the Rs.200 million that the hospital spends annually on salaries, medicine, equipment and maintenance come entirely from unsolicited donations from his devotees.

“The state government gave us land and the power supply for hospital is free,” Hegde said. “Companies give us medical equipments at discount and one computer firm installed Rs.10 million ($20,000)-worth hospital software at no cost.”

The hospital does not advertise to fill non-clinical positions. Skilled workers queue up to volunteer their services because of their faith in Sathya Sai Baba.

Those who man the gates, serve at the reception and counsel patients are all volunteers inspired by Baba’s philosophy that “seva,” or selfless service, is service to god. People wanting to offer ’seva’ are so many that there is a waiting list for volunteers, says Hegde. “We keep rotating them to give everyone a chance.”

Sai hospital is actually known as a “temple of healing” as it provides medicare in a spiritual ambiance devoid of commercialism, its employees say. “I can see god’s mission being carried out here,” said former president of India A.P.J. Abdul Kalam during a visit to the hospital in 2006. “The doctors and staff looked to me as angels.”

Free service does not mean compromising on quality or standards, Hegde points out. “Ours is as well equipped as, or better equipped than, corporate hospitals.”

The hospital, with highly qualified physicians and surgeons, attracts dozens of specialists from India and abroad because they are either devotees of Sathya Sai Baba or “infected by the desire to do seva”, says Hegde.

Sivaraman Yegyaraman, a practising cardiac electro physiologist in Stratford, New Jersey, is one such specialist who comes to Sai hospital twice a year at his own expense. “I had always wanted to place my medical training at the service of the under-privileged and Sai hospital presented me the opportunity,” he told IANS during his recent visit.

Another regular visitor, Ravindra Goyal, chairman of neurosciences at McLaren Regional Medical Center in Flint, Michigan, is a Sathya Sai Baba devotee. “Each trip to this facility charges and motivates me to apply the principle of ’selfless service’ to my work back in the US on my return,” he said.

What makes the Sai hospital unique? It is not just the state-of-the-art technology or high quality service but the spiritual ambiance pervading through the campus, says hospital manager Sri Krishna.

“It actually makes me feel I am entering a temple and not a hospital,” said Akella Chendrasekhar, medical director of Wyckoff Medical Center in New York. He was one of three specialists who came from the US spending their own money to conduct a workshop on ‘critical care medicine’ at the Sai hospital last week.

By redefining medical care Sai hospital has clearly shown it is certainly possible to provide the best treatment absolutely free, says Hegde. “There is no reason why this model cannot be replicated in other places in India and even abroad.”

The Indian Reference

Providing Hope And Healing To Heart Patients

Providing Hope And Healing To Heart Patients
Dr Michael Nobel, chairman of the Appeal of the Peace Prize Laureats Foundation, had said, ‘I have never seen anything like this on earth. It is a wonderful feeling, far removed from the national healthcare in the West, which does not seem to work very well. The impressive thing about the hospital created by Bhagwan Sathya Sai Baba is the combination of the three aspects: state-of-the-art technology, free medical treatment and the healing powers of his presence instilling in the patient the firm belief that he or she will get well.’

The Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences’ super-specialty hospital in Whitefield, near Bangalore, offers free heart surgeries to people from all walks of life. Till date this hospital has conducted nearly four lakh surgeries, according to hospital staffers, who point out that there is no billing counter here.

The hospital’s mission is to ‘provide high quality medical care absolutely on a no cost basis to all irrespective of caste, creed, religion, and financial status in an overall spiritual environment which recognises the patient as a human being and not as a diseased entity’.

Each and every patient receives the same treatment
The hospital is situated on a sprawling 53-acre complex. A large number of patients, young and old, rich and poor, get their heart problems treated free of cost. Some treatments would cost Rs 4 lakh in other medical facilities.

Y Arvind, manager of public relations at the Sri Sathya Sai Baba Institute of Higher Medical Sciences, says that the list of patients is endless. ‘We have patients throughout the day and I must tell you that we are proud of our waiting list. We meet every patient and we never promise what we cannot deliver. But we only deliver the best here. The doctors meet and evaluate each and every patient who comes here. The cases are taken up for treatment depending on their urgency,’ he added.

Every patient receives the same treatment here, free-of-cost. ‘The idea is that each patient is at the same level and if you do not pay for your treatment, then everyone is on par,’ explains Arvind proudly.

The hospital runs on donations from various philanthropists and devotees
The hospital is equipped with a fully automated information system which takes care of the patient data. The hospital also maintains a manual record of the data.

The super specialty hospital, with a built up area of 3,54,000 sq feet, houses 333 beds, eight operation theatres, six intensive care units, two cardiac cath labs and a 24-hour emergency unit. This state-of-the-art hospital, with a dedicated team of expert doctors, is also remarkable due to its Indo-Saracenic architecture and magnificent gardens.

How does the hospital dispense free medical treatment to so many patients? All the funds for the hospital come from the medical trust, which in turn receives the money in the form of donations from various philanthropists and devotees of Sathya Sai Baba. Arvind explains that on an average, the hospital authorities spend Rs 50 lakh a month on surgeries, treatment, maintenance cost and staff salary.

Not medical counseling, but patient counseling
‘We are able to manage this thanks to resource optimisation. For example, we don’t waste paper. It is compulsory for anyone using a note to use both sides of it and not throw it away after writing on only one side,’ Arvind explained.

The doctors have been instructed not to conduct medical counseling, but to conduct patient counseling for every patient. The doctors draw up an emotional profile of the patient to figure out the route of his emotional imbalance. This understanding helps the doctors in keeping their patients calm, and studies have proven that a calm mind helps heal a patient better.

Sri Sathya Sai Baba‘s first initiatives in the field of medical care began with the Sri Sathya Sai General Hospital, Prasanthi Nilayam, which was inaugurated on October 4, 1956 as a 12-bed facility for serving the poor in Puttaparthi and the surrounding villages.

Free healthcare to all patients
The initiative was aimed at giving free healthcare to all the patients seeking treatment at the hospital. Soon, the hospital began to attract patients from all across Anantapur, adjoining districts and other states. Over the years, the SSSGH grew from a single room dispensary to a sizeable general hospital with 90-bed capacity, treating patients suffering from various aliments. The Out Patient Department in the hospital now handles nearly 600 patients daily on an average.

In 1976, a second hospital, Sri Sathya Sai General Hospital, Whitefield was inaugurated by Sri Sathya Sai Baba in Bangalore. He also founded the Sri Sathya Sai Medical Trust in September 1991, to set up super-specialty hospitals to provide quality medical care to needy patients irrespective of caste, creed and religion.

State-of-the- art medical care
The first venture of the Sri Sathya Sai Medical Trust, towards providing high-tech tertiary medical care, was in the form of the Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences, Puttaparthi in November 1991. The institute provides state-of-the-art tertiary medical care absolutely free of cost to all those who came to its portals. This super specialty hospital treats diseases related to cardiology, urology and ophthalmology.

After the success of the super specialty venture in Andhra Pradesh, the government of Karnataka wanted Baba to start another super specialty hospital in Bangalore and offered 53 acres of land to build a super specialty hospital in its suburbs. The Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences, Bangalore was inaugurated on January 19, 2001.

Rediff News Reference

A True Offering To Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai Baba


A True Offering To Sathya Sai Baba

A few years ago at the time when preparations were being made to begin the construction of the Super Speciality Hospital, Bhagawan Sri Sathya Sai Baba seemingly had less time to devote to the students. Day and night He was busy with matters relating to the new hospital. Every evening immediately after darshan Bhagawan would call a group of doctors for an interview and He would discuss with them matters relating to the new hospital, even the most minute details, as this was to be a model hospital. Bhagawan would come out of the interview room only after the evening bhajans had commenced and thus the students did not have much of an opportunity to interact with Bhagawan during this period. Previously after the evening interview Bhagawan would come out and speak to the students and guide them, but this wasn’t possible at that time as Bhagawan was extremely busy. There was one very young student of Bhagawan who could no longer bear the pangs of separation from his mother Sai. He wrote a letter to Bhagawan one day and took it during evening darshan but unfortunately he was sitting a few rows back. When Bhagawan came to his side this boy got up and offered his letter to Bhagawan. Bhagawan stopped, leaned over and made a special effort to take this young boy’s letter.

To say the least this boy was ecstatic. Then the darshan continued and as usual Bhagawan called a group of doctors for an interview. All the students were depressed as they felt they had been deprived of the love of their mother Sai yet another day. Then, after about five minutes, to everyone’s utter amazement, the interview room door flew open and Bhagawan emerged in all His glory holding a small letter in His hand, the letter of the young boy. Bhagawan called that young boy to come near and asked him, “Boy, should I read aloud what you have written to me in this letter, so that everyone may listen.” The innocent boy replied. “Whatever you think or wish, Bhagawan” Bhagawan himself read the letter aloud so that all could hear. The letter was as follows:

Dear Bhagawan,

You have given so much to me and to every one here. You have provided free education for me and all my brothers and now I hear that you are constructing a BIG Hospital that will provide the most modern health care facilities to every section of the society totally free of cost. Bhagawan! I also want to be a part of your glorious mission but I am just a small boy and I don’t know how I can contribute. Bhagawan, my parents are extremely poor but in spite of that they send me a little extra pocket money every month. I know it’s due to their love and concern for me.

Bhagawan! For the last three months I have not given my clothes to the dhobi. While all other boys were sleeping in the night I washed my clothes and thus I managed to save a little money. Bhagawan! I have also resisted the temptation of toffees, chocolates and all other things and thus managed to save a little money. Bhagawan! I offer this 100 rupee note to you. I feel ashamed and small to give you so little but even if this money can be used to buy a small brick for the foundation of the new hospital, I will be the happiest child in the world.

Your loving Son.

You know the twinkle in the eye of a mother when her son does something that makes her feel extremely proud. Well, that twinkle was there in Bhagawan’s eye. Holding the 100 rupee note in His hand, Bhagawan said to that young boy. “My dear son, this is not just 100 rupees, this note is worth millions and millions of rupees for Me.”

What do we learn from this? In God’s kingdom power, wealth, position and status are of no importance whatsoever. God only looks to see whether our heart is pure. For, had God looked at the magnitude of one’s sacrifice, would Lord Rama accept the jungle fruits from the hands of Sabari and relish them, would Lord Krishna accept the banana peels instead of the bananas from the hands of Vidura and feast on them and would Bhagawan leave aside a group of highly educated doctors in the interview room and come and spend the time with this young boy? God only searches for our love and devotion.

Just before the war Arjuna was full of doubt but after receiving the message of Lord Krishna all his doubts vanished, his delusion was removed, he regained his memory and he told LORD KRISHNA: “KARISHYE VACHANAM TAVA” “I will do as you tell me”. The same principle holds good for our sports meet as well. Bhagawan guides us, inspires us, and mentions to us how the sports meet should be conducted. From then onwards all the students, right from primary to P.G. level, spare no efforts in fulfilling Bhagawan’s wish, even if it means foregoing sleep, food and comfort. The students don’t mind at all. The work done is thus transformed into worship because in everyone’s mind there is only one thought and that is to please Bhagawan Sri Sathya Sai Baba.

Reference

Pujya Shri Pramukh Swami Maharaj Visits The Shri Sathya Sai Heart Hospital – Rajkot

Pramukh Swami Maharaj

Pramukh Swami Maharaj


Pujya Shri Pramukh Swami Maharaj Visits The Shri Sathya Sai Heart Hospital – Rajkot

The head of the Swaminarayan mission, Shri Pramukh Swami Maharaj visited the Shri Sathya Sai Heart Hospital at Rajkot.

Pujya Pramukh Swami met the Tustees Bros. Kanubhai Patel and Manojbhai Bhimani who took him around the whole hospital including the Operation theatres, ICUs etc. He was very pleased with the latest medical equipment in the hospital for diagnosing and treating even the most difficult cases. He then visited the wards and personally blessed all the patients there.

He told all those present there that He was very impressed with the care and love showered to the patients there by the devoted team of the Doctors and the staff.

Article in Gujarti (Translation in English below)

Pujya Shri Pramukh Visits Sathya Sai Hospital

Pujya Shri Pramukh Visits Sathya Sai Hospital


His Holiness Shri Pramukh Swami visits Sri Sathya Sai Hospital, Rajkot
Gujarat, India – Wednesday 29th June 2005

The most revered spiritual leader and head of Shri Swaminarayan Hindu Mission (BAPS), Pujya Shri Pramukh Swami Maharaj, graced Sri Sathya Sai Super Speciality Hospital, Kalawad Road, Rajkot with a visit last Sunday. The holy man saw for himself how this renowned establishment offers free facilities and services and was impressed by how it lives up to its ‘Service to Man is Service to God’ motto. He proceeded to give his personal attention to every section of the hospital and showered his blessings upon the medical staff, patients and members of the hospital trustee group.

Very expensive heart surgery and modern treatment is available at Sri Sathya Sai Hospital no cost – regardless of any ability to pay. Every patient is seen as ‘Narayana’ – God in human form.

His Holiness showed great interest in every aspect of the work being carried out and went through the administrative offices, operation theatre, Intensive Care Unit, and met those awaiting and undergoing treatment as well as those who had already been operated upon. This gave him an over all picture of the institution and its workings. He also met dignitaries and senior surgeons and showed how pleased and impressed he was with what he had seen and heard.

He then visited the Prayer Hall and offered flowers to the image of Sri Sathya Sai Baba, whose divine message has inspired the foundation of the hospital and other major social projects throughout India and, indeed, the world.

‘This auspicious visit by such a unique spiritual personality as Pramukh Swami Maharaj is truly momentous and an inspiration to do even more’ were the sentiments expressed by the Hospital Managing Trustee, Kanubhai Patel and Joint Managing Trustee, Manojbhai Bhimani.

Shri Pramukh Swami Maharaj is the inspiration behind the creation of over 650 temples worldwide and heads an organisation which promotes social awakening, education and service to the community. Bochasanvasi Shri Akshar Purushottam Swaminarayan Sanstha is a progressive and very active movement with several million followers throughout the world.

Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences – Congenital Heart Disease

Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences – Congenital Heart Disease

Factors predicting the progress of mitral valve disease in surgically treated adults with ostium primum atrial septal defects.

Vijay Agarwal, MCh, FRCSa, Suneil Kumar Aggarwal, MRCPb,*, Choudary D. Voleti, MD, FACSa

  1. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences, Prashantigram, India
  2. Department of Cardiology, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences, Prashantigram, India

Received for publication March 6, 2008; revisions received June 23, 2008; accepted for publication August 28, 2008.

Address for reprints: Suneil K. Aggarwal, MRCP, Department of Cardiology, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences, Prashantigram, AP 515134, India.

Objective: This study was undertaken to analyze the clinical profile, associated features, and surgical treatments of adults operated on for ostium primum atrial septal defects, particularly factors influencing progression of mitral valve disease.

Methods: We retrospectively studied all patients aged 18 years and older operated on at our institution with reference to patient clinical features, investigation findings, surgical records, and outpatient follow-up data.

Results: Fifty-one patients, 29 female and 22 male, underwent operation at a mean age of 27.3 years (SD 6.9). Of these, 80% were in New York Heart Association functional class I or II, with a most frequent presenting symptom of dyspnea. On echocardiography, 88% had cleft mitral valve, 35% had moderate mitral regurgitation, and 4% had severe mitral regurgitation. According to echocardiography and available cardiac catheterization data, 27% had moderate pulmonary arterial hypertension and 8% had severe. In-hospital mortality was 1.9%. At mean follow-up of 36 months, 94% of patients were in functional class I. Mitral regurgitation was moderate in 21% and severe in 8%, with 1 patient undergoing mitral valve replacement. Factors associated with increased risk of moderate or severe mitral regurgitation on follow-up were preoperative moderate or severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (P = .008) and female sex (P = .009).

Conclusion: Surgical correction of ostium primum atrial septal defects in adults can be undertaken successfully with low mortality and excellent symptomatic results. Regular follow-up is required to assess progression of mitral regurgitation, which is more likely in women and those with preoperative pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Abbreviations and Acronyms:

  • MR = mitral regurgitation
  • NYHA = New York Heart Association
  • OPASD = ostium primum atrial septal defect
  • PAH = pulmonary arterial hypertension
  • RVSP = right ventricular systolic pressure
  • TR = tricuspid regurgitation

JTCS Reference