The Next Buddha? Buddha Boy Tapaswi Palden Dorje – Ram Bahadur Bomjon

The Next Buddha? Buddha Boy Tapaswi Palden Dorje – Ram Bahadur Bomjon
By J Ocean Dennie

J Ocean Dennie Pictures Of Ram Bahadur Bomjon aka Buddha Boy

J Ocean Dennie Pictures Of Ram Bahadur Bomjon aka Buddha Boy


In a poor backwater region of southern Nepal, an 18-year-old boy by the name of Ram Bahadur Bomjon may very well be on his way to becoming the next Buddha.

Bomjon (born c. 9 April 1990, sometimes spelled Bomjan, Banjan, or Bamjan) was dubbed ‘Buddha Boy’ by the international media back in 2005 after reports surfaced that during the course of several months of deep meditation, he neither ate nor drank. After ten months of intense media frenzy and public scrutiny, Bomjon disappeared into the jungle in March 2006, reappearing briefly later that month to announce plans to meditate in solitude for the next six years. Members of the local community and followers of Bomjon were already referring to him as the next incarnation of Buddha, something that was prophesied by Shakyamuni Buddha. In a message to devotees, however, Bomjon was quite clear that he had not yet attained Buddhahood but was simply a ‘meditator on truth’. He did suggest, however, that he was a reincarnated Tibetan rinpoche. To reflect this, the moniker Palden Dorje was adopted.

Like many others, I had first heard of ‘Buddha Boy’ during his initial period of meditation and was instantly fascinated with the story, but following this, only tidbits of news trickled out from Nepal. I thought of eventually searching for the recluse and perhaps writing an account of my adventures, imagining myself trampling through the jungle chasing whims and mirages.

I was in Bangkok when news of his public appearance suddenly broke in early November of last year. Reports at that time had indicated he would be offering darshan (a public blessing) for only a few more days. I had to act quickly, so I booked a seat on the next available flight to Kathmandu with hardly a second thought.

The list of apparent miracles associated with Palden Dorje is intriguing. In addition to his astounding feats living without sustenance or sleep, it is claimed two venomous serpents bit him with no detrimental effect. Devotees once reported seeing his head illuminated similar to the aureoles surrounding saints. On another occasion, the ground in front of him was said to have suddenly combusted into flames but he remained unscathed. He has also been spotted conversing with wildlife.

In an attempt to separate fact from legend, I planned to set out for the district of Bara, and a site near the town of Nijgadh, approximately 160 kilometers from Kathmandu.

I arrived in Simra, a convenient hub, at four in the morning after a numbing ten-hour bus ride from the capital city. I quickly checked into one of a handful of hotels in the small town known more for its choking steel factories than anything holy. After only an hour or two of rest, I hopped on a local bus, repeating to the ticket-taker, ‘Bomjon, Bomjon’. I was dropped off at the side of the highway, facing a dirt road leading into the jungle. Several hundred people were streaming down the road. As I made my way along, Nepalis and Indians passed on bicycles and tractors, in rickshaws, vans, and even crammed buses.

I eventually met up with three Nepali teens skipping school in order to receive darshan. Nirazin, was the only one of the trio to have previously seen Palden Dorje. When Nirazin first heard of him, he thought it was a joke, but after observing the young meditator up close, he realized he had made a mistake. “He is meditating for peace. He is meditating for us. I think he is the next Buddha, even though I am aware that he did not identify himself in that way”.

After a six kilometer hike to our destination, I was astonished with the sheer numbers assembled. The lineup into the gated area followed a parched river bed and extended for at least a kilometer. At the tail-end of the line were countless vendors selling fried food, religious trinkets, beads, even photos and DVD’s of Palden Dorje. Those selling traditional Tibetan kata scarves were making a killing. Nearby, there was even a hand-operated Ferris wheel. The atmosphere was festive and chaotic.
By the sheer fact I was the only visibly obvious foreigner in line, I was ushered to the front almost without delay. Entrants were forbidden to carry in cigarettes or lighters. Shoes and belts were also to be left behind. Those of us passing through the entrance were purified with water sprayed from a sprig of cedar.

We proceeded down a cordoned trail, leading back into dense jungle. Prayer flags were strewn along the path. Quickly, an ethereal serenity overtook us, accompanied by a welcome silence in contrast to the uproar of the crowds waiting in line. Everyone spoke in hushed tones, some chanted mantras, mothers shushed babies. An occasional bird song punctuated the stillness. There were butterflies everywhere.

The trail led into an arbor adorned with even more prayer flags radiating out from an imposing whitewashed stupa, about ten meters tall. In the heart of the arbor, a massive bodhi tree towered over the stupa. And there, on a pedestal at the base of the tree, sat Palden Dorje touching each kata held up to him and then dabbing the crown of the person’s head using a miniature dorje. The line was briskly moved along by a cadre of Tibetan monks and volunteer attendants.

When my turn came, I lowered my head with my arms outstretched holding the kata and walked toward him. Instead of the usual blessing, Palden Dorje grabbed the kata and slung it around my neck. I instantly felt hands on me, leading me away, but not before I had a moment to look up into his face and to gaze into his dark eyes that seemed to reflect a depth I have rarely encountered. Following this, I sat off to the side and meditated upon the scene for the rest of the morning and well into the afternoon.

I was quite taken with Palden Dorje’s appearance. For someone who had been meditating in the jungle continuously for months on end, he looked surprisingly fit and fresh. He was not emaciated in any way and I noticed he continued to maintain a fair bit of muscle tone in his arms. The messy tussled hair of earlier photos was now replaced with long curly locks well beyond shoulder length. He was donning a white robe that wrapped over his left shoulder. All in all, Palden Dorje looked comfortable and content. He remained silent save for an occasional whisper to a nearby attendant.

As the sun commenced its descent, I spoke with Romee, a Brit, and one of only a handful of foreigners present. Throughout the day, he had stood practically motionless near Palden Dorje, acting almost like a sentry, armed with poise and serenity.
Romee believed that Palden Dorje is engaged in a very high meditation that has not been publicly undertaken for centuries, if not millennia. Romee was led here through astral communications he received from the young guru. He mused that Palden Dorje will likely remain in this spot now for the rest of his life.

On my hike out back to the highway that evening, I followed the river bed which was a slightly shorter, if not dustier route. I met Moon Kim, a spry 74-year-old Korean-Canadian. “He’s a god, he’s a Buddha, whatever you want to call it,” claimed Moon. “Nobody knows how he is surviving without food or water, but it’s not a big deal for him. The way I look at it, when you go to heaven and spend a day there, a century passes here on earth, so three and a half earth years for a divine being isn’t even an hour up there.”

I returned early the next morning to receive darshan again and to continue to sit off to the side and watch the assembly line of devotees approach him for a blessing. It conjured up parallels with Amma, the famous hugging saint of southern India. It even reminded me of the solemnity of parishioners lining up to receive the sacrament of Holy Communion.

On the following morning, I was met with delirium at the gate since it was believed to be the final day of the darshan. The armed police that were present the day before were replaced on this day with boy scouts and girl scouts clearly not up to the task of crowd control. Several of the volunteers were now locked hand in hand, forming a human chain against the riotous throngs attempting to break the queue. I had to holler and wave my arms at one of them, Uman, whom I had spoken to the day before in order to gain his attention and hopefully a free pass back into the arbor. It eventually proved successful.
Before entering, I asked Uman why Palden Dorje suddenly decided to break his six-year meditation. His answer seemed to imply that conditions were ripe for a public appearance again. Uman noted how even more chaotic the situation had been at the previous site in nearby Ratanpuri. “There was just no management of the crowds back then. Now that we have been able to set up a basic system here, it makes things a lot easier for everyone.” In spite of his assurance, I noted the infancy of the infrastructure, unlike the more sprawling operation in Puttaparti, home to India’s super-celebrity guru Sathya Sai Baba.

There is definitely a pervasive rock star adoration toward Palden Dorje. One young Nepali girl I met, after asking her why she was attracted to him, said, “He’s very beautiful.” When I asked if she thought of him romantically, she blushed and said emphatically, “No, no, that would be like having God as a boyfriend.”

After parting ways with Uman, I received darshan once again and assumed my position off to the side. At some point while meditating later in the morning, an inexplicably dazzling emerald luminescence flooded my headspace for a sustained period of time before finally dissolving. There was also a period of ‘whiteness’, similar to when a camera lens is on a high exposure. Following this, throughout the afternoon, I kept sensing in my peripheral vision monks sitting beside me in meditation. When I turned my head slightly to get a better look, there was never anyone there.

As I was leaving that day, I was informed that Palden Dorje, had suddenly decided to add three more days to the darshan since people just kept coming. It looked like I would be sticking around for a little longer then.

The next day, however, threw me for another loop. This time, as I made my way down the dusty river bed, I noticed there was an almost complete absence of people heading in. There was no line-up and the arbor was even more exceptionally quiet than usual. Palden Dorje’s countenance displayed a hint of bewilderment with the trickle of people.

In spite of this, he continued undeterred. On two separate occasions, thunder struck from a completely cloudless sky. Palden Dorje looked up quickly and scanned the skies both times as if in search of some sign. Apparently, Palden Dorje had mentioned in the past that the gods would be present during his tenure and would manifest as thunder.

As each day passed, my meditations grew progressively stronger. On the fifth day, there was a robust serenity in both body and mind despite the onset of a head cold. (I had been sneezing viciously before entering the arbor). There was very little bodily discomfort, however, as I ventured deeper into Void.

The final day of the darshan saw a return to chaos. The gigantic crowd was in turmoil again and some people were seething with anger due to the constant stream of queue jumpers. Once again, thankfully, I was plucked out of the line by a boy scout who took some interest in me. He accompanied me to the area near the gate, which was sealed at that time and surrounded by monks.
When we were finally allowed in, I wondered: could this really be a scam? Could all these monks and nuns and volunteers and serious devotees, committed to the pursuit of truth, be mistaken? If the local community was trying to reap financial benefits from the Buddha Boy phenomenon as some suggested, why restrict his public appearances? If the skeptics were to be believed, then where was the incontrovertible proof of wrongdoing? So far, I had seen nothing convincing to tarnish a reputation.

I was led to a section reserved for journalists very close to where Palden Dorje sat on his pedestal, boxed in by cloth erected to act as a visual barrier. At least half a dozen news network cameras from Nepal or India were arranged in front with a barrage of microphones. A single female Western journalist scribbled notes onto a pad. Monks and nuns were seated opposite us in a section reserved exclusively for them. The public then sat in a wide circle around the tree.

As the minutes passed, the restlessness escalated into a madhouse mania. Though it seemed quite comical and silly, there was a tinge of sadness when I realized how we contort such a thing of virtue into a media-exploited extravaganza. I am just as much to blame. I worry that a simple purity will be devoured by the obsessive sophistications of our society. A boy meditating in the jungle is not enough for us. World tours, bestsellers and talk show interviews would be the new standard.

Palden Dorje stood up to the microphones and held the attention of the restless crowd for the ten minutes or so that he spoke in Nepali. Strangely, he concluded halfway between a sentence, trailing off, letting the words, both spoken and unspoken, hang in the air. The brief spell of serenity quickly degenerated into a frenzy again as Palden Dorje returned to his pedestal and people began lining up to receive darshan. The young man suddenly shifted gears into overdrive, ludicrously blessing with a pace so quick he was practically bonking people on the head with the dorje as they passed.

In the midst of the pushing and shoving nearby, I was led into a profound meditation, insulated from the riot but still acutely aware of it. I remained motionless in body and mind for over an hour. When I opened my eyes, I noticed I was the only one in the midst of thousands who had bothered to do such a thing. At least Palden Dorje was smiling. It was all quite surreal. Instead of trying to line up, I left quietly, bowing inconspicuously, brimming with a wondrous delight.

Since Palden Dorje was not about to indulge me with an exclusive interview, I wanted to speak to a fellow by the name of Jas Waiba. As a member of the steering committee that liaises with Palden Dorje, I figured he would be a reliable authority. When I arrived at the site the next day, I was not surprised to see the place practically deserted – all the vendors had disappeared while only a handful of monks and nuns remained, packing up in preparation to head out. Plastic bags tossed about silently on a slight breeze. The gate was barricaded and a single monk sat in the shade to guard against any unauthorized entry. The whole thing had the feel of the day following the conclusion of an outdoor music festival. Palden Dorje was on his own again.

I eventually caught up to Jas on his way home. Jas has been a committee member for over a year now. The committee is comprised of members mostly from local communities. It was formed as a response to the crowds and problems that swelled as news of the boy spread like wildfire. Jas told me the committee can do nothing without the consent of Palden Dorje. Typically, the committee is summoned when a signal is received from Palden Dorje, a signal only one or two individuals have knowledge of.
“Before,” Jas exclaimed, “Palden Dorje was in deep meditation. Now, he is conducting special esoteric exercises and holding conversations with gods.” I asked him if he himself had been privy to any miracles. With a slightly ominous tone, Jas said, “sometimes, we hear explosions and trees cracking, and when we go to investigate, there is no sign of any damage.”

Over lunch, Jas is quite straightforward in his assessment of Palden Dorje. “He is a bodhisattva. In the future, he will be Maitreya, the next Buddha. This is a certainty. I am confident in this because I have witnessed how he mixes peace with power. He can destroy and he can create. I cannot give you all the details at this time because I have been sworn to secrecy with respect to some matters.” He later hinted, however, toward some esoteric power that could possibly render the weapons of the world completely useless.

Jas is unconcerned with the naysayers. “There is no way to dispute them. Everyone has a right to be skeptical. It is not my job to convince them. I know what I know. Truth comes through illumination not attempts at convincing someone.”

Palden Dorje could very well be the one the world has waited for, but how can someone ever know for sure. He is markedly different from other gurus I have encountered. No matter what his status, he is an inspiration.

Although I can certainly say that Palden Dorje embodies a very powerful essence, what else had I actually discovered about him? It all seemed so ephemeral. I felt like I had failed to clearly ascertain the truth behind this Nepali teen but, on the other hand, I realized there is some value in what remains mysterious.

So perhaps it is best to leave it as such. Better yet, when he is ready for visitors again, why not book a flight to Nepal and experience the phenomenon for yourself?

This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com

Digital Journal Reference

Ram Bomjon – Buddha Boy Banjan – Ram Bomjan – Buddha Boy Bamjan – Nepal Buddha Boy Documentary

Love & Liberation

Sathya Sai Baba - Love And Liberation

Sathya Sai Baba - Love And Liberation


Love & Liberation

“True and effective forgiveness includes forgetting, but the memory of some wrong done may exist somewhere in the mind. It is not as easy as cleaning a word from a slate, or erasing it from a piece of paper,” says Mr. Howard Murphet in the final chapter of his book “Sai Inner Views.” He goes on to beautifully explain the intimate connection between forgiveness, healing, love and finally, liberation.

Even though love is perhaps the most common four lettered word and an emotion that is alien to none on this planet, at the same time, only a handful have understood its truest form and experienced the true bliss arising there from. It is to help us in understanding this seemingly simple but extremely profound idea that can change our life dramatically from dust to diamond, that we have this article for you.

The author, Mr. Howard Murphet, was an Australian journalist who came to Bhagavan Baba in 1964, and later authored many books on Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba, the most popular of them being “Sai Baba: Man of Miracles”. He wrote many volumes after that like “Sai Baba: Avatar”, “Sai Baba : Invitation to Glory”, “When the Road Ends”, and so on. The book “Sai Inner Views” from which the present article is an extract was composed by him when he was in his nineties and had lost his eye-sight, but the insight he has left behind for humanity is immense and precious, which you will perceive as you read on.

“Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.” These well-known words from the Lord’s Prayer have a deeper implication than it may at first appear. In His mission on earth, Jesus showed that there was a very close connection between the forgiveness of trespass, or sin, and the healing of diseases. After healing somebody, He would say, “Your sins are forgiven. Now go your way and sin no more.”

The Need to Forgive
At the healing centre of a church I know in Australia, the sick person is told by the Christian priest in charge that before any healing can be accomplished, the patient must ask God for forgiveness and prior to that he must forgive anybody who he thinks has sinned against him.

This forgiving of those who have trespassed against him will, no doubt, involve a search back through many years to unearth anyone against whom he may still feel some resentment, hidden anger or any other signs of non-forgiveness. Having located the person against whom he holds any of these negative emotions, he must declare sincerely in his heart and mind that he truly forgives him. But such a declaration of forgiveness, if he also says in his mind, “But I cannot forget”, is not true forgiveness.

True and effective forgiveness, includes forgetting, but the memory of some wrong done may exist somewhere in the mind. It is not as easy as cleaning a word from a slate, or erasing it from a piece of paper. In forgiving those who have trespassed against us, we must effectively forget it, by never again dwelling on the wrongs we think have been done against us. Until this is accomplished sincerely, we cannot expect the Divine One to forgive our trespasses or sins.

Some patients ask, “Does this mean that God is unable to forgive us until we have truly forgiven all those who have trespassed against us, or is it that He will not?” We must remember that God is omnipotent and can therefore do anything He wills to do. Because as well as being omnipotent, He is also omniscient and compassionate, He will answer any prayer that does not go against the ultimate spiritual welfare of the one who prays. Why then this requirement that we must forgive before we are forgiven? And why is the whole process of forgiving and being forgiven essential before the truly effective healing of a person’s disease?

Understanding True Love
To understand this, we must take a penetrating look into that which we know as divine, unconditional love. We must be careful not to confuse such a love with the so-called romantic love that comes as a result of Cupid’s irresponsible arrow-shooting. This love is an emotional state that keeps a man and a woman in a state of constant agitation, a state of great joy and ecstasy followed by misery and sorrow. Even so, romantic love between man and woman may be an echo of the real thing because it does bring some moments, a few flashes of the great bliss that lies above the passing joys and pains. Thus, in a sense, it is a promise of the true love that will someday come.

Perhaps, the best echo in man and in other animals of the divine love, for which we are forever searching, is what we call mother-love. This, at its best, is completely unselfish, giving-and-forgiving. It demands no return in its purest state, yet like God Himself, the mother does enjoy a response of love for love. Mother-love is certainly brave, even warrior-like in its protectiveness of its offspring. I have seen mother geese attack big farm horses that have strayed too close to the young goslings. The mother goose will face almost any danger to shield her young from harm.

When I was a boy I thought that mother magpies went a bit too far in this. If I inadvertently came too close to a tree where the baby magpies were being hatched out of their shells in some high-up nest, I was attacked by mother magpie from the air. Other birds, including plovers, took the same protective, aggressive action against boys whom they thought were likely to steal their eggs. Such love in human beings is equally strong and lasts longer. It can, however, in time become tainted. It may become more attachment than love, sprouting selfish tentacles to contaminate the original selfless love of the mother.

Is it possible, we wonder, to find somewhere that pure selfless never-changing love that forgives and gives, and asks nothing in return? Yes, it is possible to find and experience that love. First, let us try to understand something of what it is. As the great seer-poet Dante said, “Love is the energy that moves the Sun and the other stars.” In fact, it is the primal power that created the universe and holds it together as one unit or system. It could be called the great cosmic magnet that keeps the wheels of the cosmos turning. As Swami says, God is Love and the energy He emanated in creating the universe, the premier energy, the primal energy to begin creation and hold it together, is love.

In Sanskrit, this pure love of God is called prema, and in the fullness of time, this divine magnet which we call love draws all things back into conscious oneness with the great Creator. Those, who have eyes to see, witness its reality around them as the inner-truth of the one within the many. Their eyes may fill with tears as their inner-vision apprehends this essence of divine oneness in the beauty of a flower, or a cloud, or the words of a poem. But, above and beyond these occasional flashes of the great truth, there is a way to experience the flow within one’s being of this primal prema, or divine love. That is, to come within the aura, or the influence, of one who may be called living divinity, for such a one is a veritable fountain of love.

Sri Sathya Sai Baba – Living Avatar of Love
The greatest of these in my own experience is the living Avatar, Sri Sathya Sai Baba. Undoubtedly, there are others on earth today who can, to some degree, as Baba does in full measure, open the human heart to release the flow of love that is waiting there. It is the wonderful influence of such Godmen that finds and opens the buried spring of love, pure unconditional love, that is hidden in every person’s heart.

But, of course, not everybody who has set his feet on the spiritual path will have the good fortune of meeting one of these divine surgeons of the spiritual heart who will bring forth the flow of love. Perhaps, it is safe to say that the majority will not. Therefore, there must, surely be some other way. Yes, there are several. For one, a deep study of the philosophy concerning the reality and truth of divine love is of great help. We must understand that this prema is the primary force within the universe and is the great magnet that holds all in oneness, finally bringing all into our realisation of this unity with its attendant felicity and never-ending yet ever-changing bliss.

With this understanding of the mind and even with slight glimpses, passing experiences of the divine love in our hearts, we will do all we can to practise and promote this important power of love in our lives. How do we do that? As the old French bishop said to the young priest, about this puzzling question, “You learn to walk by walking, you learn to ride a bicycle by riding one. You learn to swim by getting in the water and trying until you learn. There are many things you must learn just by doing them, and loving is one. You learn to love by loving. The more you practise loving, the more love you will develop, until in the end you will be a master in the art of loving.”

Practising the Presence of Love
That is the key. Realise that it is the most important thing in your life and begin to practise it on your fellow-men. Start with those who are easy to love. In the end you will be loving those to whom you are indifferent, and eventually even hate will be replaced by love. Furthermore, this trickle of love for our fellow-men can grow into a full stream through heart-felt worship and devotion to one of the princes of love no longer in the body. Two such are Christ and Krishna. Calling on their hallowed names and picturing their forms will help release the pent-up divine love in the human heart.

Finally, we should be aware that, in our own individual divine plan to love not only all of humanity but all of life, forgiveness is the greatest builder of love. Forgiving others and being forgiven by God repairs the broken channels through which the unifying and healing streams of love are meant to flow. In this divine business of forgiving there is one aspect that we should try to understand and remember. You may have heard people say that it is important to forgive ourselves. That is true but who forgives whom in ourselves? The social science of psychology divides us into many different parts, the number and names of these depending on the particular system of psychology we study.

Divine science divides the human being into two main parts. These are, the lower self, usually called the ego, and the high Self, being synonymous with the God within. These two inhabit the one human body. An interesting analogy is shown in the Indian story about two birds which live in the same tree. One has his nest and his existence on the lower branches. He is a very busy little bird, following his instinctive life of food-gathering, mating and fighting the enemies who want to usurp his territory.

Sometimes he is happy, at times he is angry and sometimes tragically sad. He catches in his active lifestyle occasional glimpses of another bird living in the thick branches of the tree above him. This bird of the shining plumage seems to live a very calm and contented life, never fighting with other birds over territory or morsels of food. Though in the same tree, this ‘top bird’ seems to live in a different world. His songs are full of joy, flowing from him, naturally. In time, the ‘lower bird’, by comparison, sees his own little life as a continual struggle on the treadmill of desires. He longs to be like the shining bird, the calm, beautiful, wise bird on the lofty branches.

The wise bird sees all that his little brother on the lower branches is doing. He knows that his brother on the lower branches will, in the course of time, learn the vital lessons that will make him discard his many agitating desires and start to climb the branches where he can live the life of the higher bird, the life of calmness and peace, the life of light and joy. The high bird will then do all he can to help his lower brother upward, until in love they finally merge as one. The busy bird on the lower branch represents the human lower self or ego, while the bird in the upper branch symbolises our higher Self, our true divine Self.

Being Forgiven by God
In the question of forgiving, what is known as forgiving ourselves must mean the divine Self, who has no sin, but witnesses the misdemeanours, the trespasses, the foolish errors of the little thoughtless desire-filled ego, must be the forgiver of the sins of the ego. So it is that the sinful ego must be forgiven by the divine Self so that forgiving ourselves is the same as being forgiven by God. Our inner God is no different from the one great eternal God who is omnipresent in the universe. In brief, to be forgiven by God is the same as forgiving ourselves.

The inner God forgives the erring ego. It is clear, then, that this process of forgiving and being forgiven, mending as it does the shattered truth of oneness, is one of the most important roads to the state of living in universal love. This is not far from, and may itself be, the liberation we seek. It is said that when an individual reaches this state of enlightenment, or liberation from the bondage of all earthly desires, two paths lie open to him. One is that he may rest in Nirvana, which means being merged with the Divine Absolute for eternity. Otherwise, through the power of the divine love that is now his very being, he may help to do the work of God while merged in Him. That is, he may help his brothers and sisters on earth to mend the broken bridges that hold them in the sorrows of mortal existence, thus bringing them to the truth and joy that he has found.

The first way could be called the Nirvana of rest, and the second the Nirvana of divine action. To attempt to describe what this state of Nirvana or liberation is would be an attempt to describe the indescribable. But Paramahansa Yogananda has given a concept of this that is worthy of our contemplation. What he says, in paraphrase, is that in time we become tired of everything, even pleasure and happiness.

Even from the high heavens of joy, men and gods come back to earth to seek the spring-board that will take them beyond the high heavens, in other words, to unity with God or Nirvana. This, he says, is “ever-changing, ever-new, ever-lasting bliss”. It is a joy, though eternal, is ever new. This, I feel, is a worthwhile attempt to explain the inexplicable.

“When I wake in the morning thy love is there,
Like the golden sunrise in clear mountain air,
And, sheltered all day in thy aura of blue,
I rest in the beauty and love of you.
There’s a silent presence, whatever I do,
Lighting the hours as the day wears through.
Come nearer and nearer, great Lord divine,
Till thy being is mine and mine is thine,
Till this ego can really cease to be,
And I am forever one with thee.
Then, though atoms burst and mountains fall,
No earthly disasters can matter at all,
And even the dark of the cosmic night
Shall shine with thy love in eternal light.”

Reference

Insights About Happiness

Insights About Happiness By Swami Sivananda & Sathya Sai Baba

“At the doors of large granaries are placed traps containing fried rice (Moori) to catch mice. The mice, attracted by the flavour of the fried rice, forgets the more solid pleasure of tasting the rice inside the granary, and fall into the trap. They are caught therein and killed. Just so is the case with the soul. It stands on the threshold of Divine bliss, which is like millions of the highest worldly pleasures solidified into one; but instead of striving for that bliss, it allows itself to be enticed by the petty pleasures of the world and falls into the trap of Maya, the great illusion, and dies therein”. – Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa

INTRODUCTION
Man wants happiness. He shuns pain. He moves heaven and earth to get the happiness he wants from sensual objects, and lo, gets himself entangled in the extricable meshes of Maya. Poor man! He does not know that these objects are perishable and evanescent, finite and conditioned in time, space, and causation. And what is more, he fails to get the desired happiness from them.

Sensual pleasure is tantalizing. There is enchantment so long as man does not possess the objects. The moment he is in possession of the object, the charm vanishes. He finds that he is in entanglement.

The bachelor thinks of his marriage, day and night. He thinks he is in imprisonment after the marriage is over. He is not able to satisfy the extravagant wants of his wife. He wants to run away from the house to forests. The rich but childless man thinks he will be more happy by getting a son, goes on pilgrimage to Ramesvaram and Kasi, and performs various religious ceremonies. But when he gets a child, he feels miserable; the child suffers from epileptic fits and his money is given away to doctors. Even then, there is no cure. This is Mayaic jugglery. The whole world is fraught with temptation.

A SPECTACLE OF SORROW
A worldly man is always drowned in sorrow. He is ever struggling to get something, some money, some power, some position, and so on. He is always anxious as to whether or not he would get it. Even when he is in actual possession of the thing he so passionately longed for, he is very anxious lest he should lose it.

A rich man has great wealth, but he has no children. And so he is pained at heart. A poor man has fourteen children, but he has nothing to eat, and so he is miserable. One man has wealth and children, but his son is a vagabond, and so he is worried. One man has riches and good sons, but his wife is very quarrelsome. No one is happy in this world.

The session judge is very discontented. He thirsts to become a high court judge. The minister is also discontented. He longs to become the premier. A millionaire is discontented; he yearns to become a Croropati (Billionaire). The husband is discontented; his wife is black and thin; he wants to marry another wife with good complexion. The wife is discontented; she want to divorce and marry a rich, young husband. A lean man is discontented; he wants to put on fat and gulps cod-liver oil. A fat man takes antifat pills. No man is contented in this world.

A doctor thinks that the advocate is very happy. The advocate thinks that the businessman is more happy. The businessman thinks that the judge is more happy. The judge thinks that the professor is more happy. No one is happy in this world.

An emperor is not happy. A dictator is not happy. A president of a state is not happy. God Indra is not happy.

Who is happy then ? A sage is happy. A Yogi is happy. He who has controlled his mind is happy.

Happiness comes from peace of mind. Peace of mind comes from a state of mind wherein there are no desires, no Moha, no Vishaya, no thoughts of objects. You should forget all ideas of pleasure before you enter the domain of peace.

PLEASURE IS MIXED WITH PAIN
You cannot have pleasure without pain. Wherever there is pleasure, there is pain. You vainly seek pleasure in gold, in women (or men in the case of women), in this mundane existence. You cannot have absolute happiness in a relative physical plane of pairs of opposites. The pairs of opposites rotate in their turn. Death follows life. Night follows day. Light follows darkness. Pain follows pleasure.

One part of pleasure is mixed with fifteen parts of pain. Pleasure that is mixed with pain, fear and worry is no pleasure at all. If you carefully begin to analyze this one part of pleasure also, it will dwindle into an airy nothing. You will find that it is mere play of the mind.

Pleasure and pain are relative terms only. They are not two entities. They are obverse and reverse sides of the same coin. The difference is not in kind, but in degree only.

Pleasure and pain are two names for one thing. They are two aspects of one thing. For a worldly man without philosophical knowledge, they appear as two different entities.

PLEASURE AND PAIN LIE IN THE MIND
What is pleasure for you is pain for another. What is pleasure for you now is pain after some time. The first two cups of milk gives you pleasure. The third cup induces disgust, nausea and retching. Milk does not give pleasure during fever. Therefore, pleasure is not in the objects, but in the imagination or inclination of the mind.

Pleasure and pain, beauty and ugliness, are all false imaginations of the mind. Mind is a false, illusory product. Conceptions of the mind also must, therefore, be false.

Pleasure and pain are in the mind only. It is subjective. Things, when longed for, are pleasant; but are bitter if not longed for. Desires are the cause for pleasures.

You can convert pleasure into pain and pain into pleasure by thinking, by Bhavana, by imagination. Many vegetarian students who have gone to England to prosecute their studies have become inveterate meat-eaters. Meat was very repulsive to them when they were in India. Mere sight used to induce vomiting. How is it they are able to relish meat with avidity, cupidity and stupidity now ? By simple change in thinking.

Ignorant persons attribute their pleasure to external objects. That is a serious blunder, indeed. Really, there is no pleasure in objects. There is neither pleasure nor pain in objects. It is all mental creation, mental perception, mental jugglery. It is only the mental attitude or a certain kind of mental behaviour towards objects that bring joy or grief, pleasure or pain. Maya has her powerful seat in the imagination of the mind.

When you are in acute agony, a cup of coffee, milk or tea does not give you any pleasure. When you are in acute agony, the whole world which appeared to you to be full of bliss while in good health, appears quite dreary. The world loses all its charms while you are seriously ailing. A real thing must give pleasure for everybody at all times. Is it not ?

PLEASURE IS THE CAUSE OF PAIN
The cause of pain is pleasure. The man who is addicted to taking tea, and is in the habit of taking fruits and milk after meals, feels very miserable when he cannot get tea, or fruits and milk, in a certain place. When the wife dies, the husband is drowned in sorrow, not because of the loss of his loving partner in life, but because he cannot get sexual pleasure now.

The cause of pain is pleasure. The cause of death is love for sensual life. Give up all sensual pleasures, if you do not want pain. Give up sensual life, if you do not want death.

Enjoyment cannot bring satisfaction of desire. On the contrary, it aggravates and intensifies desires and makes the mind more restless through sense-hankering or Trishna, just as the pouring of ghee or oil aggravates fire. The fewer the wants, the greater the happiness.

Many rich persons, in spite of their immense wealth and possession of two or three wives, are extremely miserable and unhappy. I have come in contact with several rich landlords. They are all discontented, restless, peevish and very miserable. It is evident, therefore, that happiness does not lie either in money, objects or woman (or man).

THE SOURCE OF HAPPINESS
There is no happiness at all in any of the objects of the world. There is not an iota of happiness in objects, because they are insentient. Even the sensual pleasure is a reflection of the Atmic bliss only. It is sheer ignorance to think that we derive any pleasure from the sense-objects or from the mind.

When there is a desire in the mind, the mind is filled with Rajas. It is in an agitated condition. It is restless and unpeaceful. It will be restless till the desired object is attained. When the object is attained and enjoyed, when the desire is gratified, the mind moves towards the Inner Soul. It ceases functioning. It is filled with Sattva. All thoughts subside for a split second; the mind rests in the Soul within. The Soul’s bliss is reflected in the intellect. But the ignorant man thinks that he is getting the happiness from the object; just as the dog which is biting a dry bone imagines that it is getting the pleasure from the bone, that the blood is oozing from the bone, whereas in reality, the blood comes from its own palate.

REAL HAPPINESS IS WITHIN
Real happiness is within you. It is in the Atman. It is subjective. It manifests when the mind is concentrated. When the Indriyas are withdrawn from the objects outside, when the mind is one-pointed, when there is Vasana-kshya and Manonasa, when you become desireless and thoughtless, Atmic bliss begins to dawn, spiritual Ananda begins to thrill.

The musk is in the navel of the deer, but it runs here and there to smell it. The chain is in the neck of the damsel, but she runs hither and thither in search of it. The precious diamond is within you, but you run after the broken glass-pieces in vain. Even so, the ocean of bliss is within you; the fountain of joy is within you; and yet, you run here and there in search of it. The Sun of suns is ever shining in you, but your blind eyes cannot behold it. The eternal sound is ringing within you, but your deaf ears cannot hear it.

Go wherever you may, to Gulmarg or Pahalgam in Kashmir, to Darjeeling in Simla, to Vienna or the Alps. It is all the same. You will not find any real rest. The charming scenery may soothe the retina for a second. Raga, Dvesha, jealousy, passion and greed are everywhere. You will find the same earth, the same sky, the same air, and the same water. And you carry with you the same mind. Imagination and change of place have deceived not a few. O man! Be contented. Live where you may, but discipline the mind and the senses. Meditate on the Inner self, the Antaratman, ceaselessly. Here you will find everlasting peace. Mind will stop deceiving you now.

Raja Bhartrihari, Raja Gopichand, Lord Buddha deserted kingdom and all pleasurable objects, palaces, music, children, wife, etc., to attain Atmic bliss which is everlasting. They attained immortality. They are not fools. Had there been real happiness in objects, they would have stuck to this world. The difficulty is that the worldly men with gross Vyavaharic Buddhi are not able to understand or comprehend a supersensual spiritual bliss that exists beyond the senses, mind and intellect.

SENSUAL PLEASURE AND SPIRITUAL BLISS
Spiritual bliss is the highest bliss. Spiritual bliss is bliss of one’s own Soul. It is transcendental bliss. It is independent of objects. It is continuous, uniform and eternal. It is enjoyed by the sage only.

Sensual pleasure comes out of emotion. But bliss of the Soul is self-delight. It is the innate nature of the Atman. Pleasure is temporal and fleeting. Bliss is eternal and everlasting. Pleasure is mixed with pain. Bliss is unalloyed happiness. Pleasure depends upon nerves, mind and objects. Bliss is independent and self-existent. There is effort in attaining sensual pleasures, but there is no striving in experiencing the bliss of the Soul. The drop joins the ocean. The Jiva floats in the ocean of bliss.

Purify the mind by Japa, Satsanga, charity, control of mind, self-restraint, selfless service, study of the Gita, the Upanishads, Yoga-Vasishtha, Bible, Koran and other religious scriptures, practice of Yama and Niyama, Pranayama, Vairagya and Tyaga. You will then get a proper instrument for meditation, a calm, sharp, subtle, one-pointed mind. Start meditation with the help of this instrument for three hours in the morning and three hours at night. Then a new kind of indescribable Ananda will dawn in you. You will be convinced of a supersensual spiritual bliss. You will have to feel this spiritual Ananda yourself. You will have to eat it yourself. Can you explain the sexual happiness to a boy of twelve? Can you explain the happiness of sugar-candy to a boy who has not tasted the same ? No, you cannot. The boy himself must eat sugar-candy. He must, when he has grown up, taste the carnal pleasure.

Worldly men think they are quite happy because they get a few ginger biscuits, some money, and a woman. O, if they would just taste the nectar of immortality, what should be the intensity of happiness they should feel!

The body is an abode of misery and disease. Wealth brings a lot of trouble in acquiring and keeping safe. Sorrow springs from every connection. Women (or Men) are a perpetual source of vexation. Alas! people prefer this path of misery to that of spiritual enjoyment.

Enough, enough of your tea and coffee, enough of soda and lemonade, enough of father, mother, son, daughter, brother, sister and relations. You have had countless fathers and mothers, wives and children in the past. You came alone. You will go alone. None will follow you save your own actions. Realize God. All miseries will come to an end.

Though surrounded by pleasurable or painful objects to disturb your equilibrium of mind, remain immovable as a rock, receiving all things with equanimity. Be always cheerful. Laugh and smile. How can a mind that is gloomy and dull think of God ? Try to be happy always. Happiness is your very nature. This is termed cheerfulness. This spirit of cheerfulness must be cultivated by all aspirants.

Keep the mind in state of moderation or happy, golden mean. Never let it run to excesses. People die of shock from extreme depression as well as extreme joy. Do not allow Uddharsha to crop up in the mind. It is excessive merriment. Mind always runs to extremes, either to extreme depression or extreme joy. Extremes meet. Extremes bring about reaction. Mind can never be calm in excessive joy. Let the mind be cheerful, but calm.

This world is a mere appearance. Mind and the senses are deceiving you every moment. You have mistaken pain for pleasure. There is not even an iota of happiness in this sense-universe. Abandon these selfish struggles and schemes for amassing wealth. March directly to that wire-puller who is moving these toys of fleshy human bodies, who is keeping up this big show. In Him only you will find lasting happiness and perennial joy. Merge in Him by practicing daily meditation and japa.

Reference

Sathya Sai Baba Quotes On Happiness

Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai Baba: “Within you is the real happiness. Within you is the mighty ocean of nectar divine. Seek it within you!”

Sathya Sai Baba: “If you want peace and if you want happiness you must live in love. Only through love will you find inner peace. Only through love will you find true happiness. Love flourishes through giving and forgiving. Develop your love! Immerse yourself in love!”

Sathya Sai Baba: “The happiness of everyone is My happiness. This is the inner meaning ofthe prayer, lokah samasthah sukhino bhavan-thu (May all the people of the world be happy).”

Sathya Sai Baba: “The person who is wedded to Truth and Love would need nothing more for peace and happiness. When Creation is witnessed through these values, it becomes holy scripture, an inspiring lesson and guide.”

Sathya Sai Baba: “I have come not to disturb or destroy any Faith, but to confirm in his own Faith, so that the Christian becomes a better Christian, the Muslim a better Muslim and a Hindu a better Hindu. I have come to reconstruct the ancient highway to God; to instruct all in the essence of Vedas, to shower on all this precious gift; to protect Sanathana Dharma, the Ancient Wisdom and to preserve it. My Mission is to serve happiness and so I am always happy to come among you, not once but twice, thrice as often as you want me. To set right those who have taken to wrong path and to protect the good people, Sai will be born again and again. I have come to light the lamp of Love in your hearts, to see that it shines day by day with added luster. I have not come on any mission or publicity for any sect or creed or cause nor have I come to collect followers for any doctrine. I have no plans to attract disciples or devotees into my fold or any fold. I have come to tell you of the Universal, Unitary Faith, this Path of Love, this Duty of Love, this Obligation to Love. Believe that all hearts motivated by the One and Only God, that all Faiths glorify the One and Only God, that all Names in all languages and all Forms man can conceive, denote the One and Only God. His adoration is best done by means of Love. Cultivate that attitude of Oneness between men of all creeds, all countries, and all continents. This is the message of Love I bring!”

Sathya Sai Baba – Buddha – Sai Buddha Gayathri Mantra

Sri Sathya Sai

Sri Sathya Sai

Sathya Sai Baba – Buddha – Sai Buddha Gayathri
Bhagavaan Shree Sathya Sai Baba is the latest advent of the Divine in human form, just as Bhagavaan Buddha’s advent about 2500 years ago in order to uplift humanity in moral and spiritual terms. There are striking similarities between the two.

First, Buddha was known as Buddha the Compassionate. So is Sathya Sai who is compassion and kindness personified. Both of them epitomize the qualities of dhaya and dharma, i.e. compassion and righteousness based on love and non-violence. Love all, serve all. For both, Ahimsa is paramodharmah. Help ever, hurt never is the single most important motto.

Second, Buddha was so called because he was the enlightened person, and the cause of enlightenment of fellow human beings. Therefore, he is called Maha Maanava, a highly exalted human personality. Sri Sathya Sai is the quintessence of spiritual wisdom and practice of human values. He can be truly called Maanavatha Dharma Nirmaatha, the builder of the culture of human values. Both of them exemplify Buddhi Yoga, the yoga of creative intelligence for self-transformation and realization. Both are world preceptors (jagat gurus) of supreme wisdom. Aadhi Shankara calls the Buddha as the Prabuddha, the perfectly awakened one, and also as the emperor of all the yogis in Kali Yuga (Kalau Yoginaam Chakravarthi). Baba is acknowledged to be the emperor of Universal Spirituality, Prapancha Aaadhyaatmika Chakravarthi. Buddha or for that matter Buddhism is free from dogmas, it is not a proselytizing religion. So is Sanathana Dharma as expounded by Baba. It is a universal, ancient but ever new, eternal and pervasive moral and spiritual value system.

Third, Buddha’s form radiates ineffable peace in tranquility and serenity. He was called the prince of peace. So also Baba is the picture of Prashaanthi, perfect peace in contentment and bliss. Both combine supreme detachment within and Dhaarmik activism on the outside.

For peace, Baba says master your mind and become a master of the mind like Buddha. To control the mind control desires, and to control desires control the senses. Bliss is within one’s own-self and not outside, according to both the Buddha and Baba. It is only with the control of senses that one can reach the state of peace and bliss, as exemplified in the life of Buddha and Baba. Bhagavaan Baba also says where there is truth there is bliss, where there is bliss there is peace, and where there is peace there is God. Bhagavaan Buddha’s quest for peace led him to formulate the eight-fold path, which includes Samyak Dhristhi, total or good vision, Samyak Vaak, good speech, Samyak Shravanam, good listening, Samyak Bhabhaana, good thought and Samyak Karma, good actions. Similarly, Baba says watch your Words, Actions, Thoughts, Character and Heart. Both the Buddha and Baba stress silence to steady the mind. Truth (or God) is envisioned in the depth of silence, in deep contemplation.

Due to the divine inspiration of Baba on this Buddha Puurnima morning when He entered the Sai Ramesh Hall, filled with thousands of Buddhists and devotees from Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Japan and India among others, in His resplendent deep orange coloured robes, my thoughts were so intensely focused on the two divine advents, that the Sai Buddha Gaayathree Manthra began to jell in my mind. This Manthra, in Vedhik Gaayathree format, is composed of 24 letters with three parts of 8 syllables each:

OM: DHAYATHMANAAYA VIDHMAHE
SAI BUDHHAAYA DHEEMAHI
THANNAH SHAANTHAH PRACHODHAYAATH

Meaning: We have come to know of this divine personality with supreme compassion. We wholeheartedly contemplate this divine Sai Buddha, the embodiment of supreme wisdom and spiritual power. We pray that this embodiment of divine PEACE and BLISS bestow on us the same felicity of peace and bliss and lead us to enlightenment and liberation.

The above Sai Buddha Gaayathree Manthra can be contemplated by anyone, at any time and at any place. Thereby a seeker gains the capacity to be kinder and more compassionate to all living beings; it also increases the power of discrimination between good and bad, and the permanent and transient as well as the power of determination to pursue righteous actions for human welfare. Furthermore, the Manthra yields inner peace and happiness and above all enlightenment, resulting in reaching the state of Sai Buddha-hood! Hail to Sai-Buddha!

Note: It is significant as in the case of the Sai Gaayathree that the number – equivalents of the letters contained in Sai Buddha Gaayathree total 109 according to the rules of Maharishi Vara Ruchi. On a par with the Sai (Eashwara) Gaayathree, it can be taken to mean that the recitation of this Manthra for 108 times will take the seeker to the final 109th step, as reaching the tassel (Sumeru) in the rosary (Japamala).

SAI BUDDHAM SHARANAM GACHHAAMI!

Brindavan Ashram, G. V. Subba Rao
White Field, Bangalore – Buddha Puurnima, 26 May, 2002

Buddha

Buddha