Open Campus At Satya Sai Institute

Open Campus At Satya Sai Institute
Category » Bhopal » Posted On Tuesday, January 19, 2010
By Our Staff Reporter

Bhopal: A two-day open campus was held under the aegis of Sri Satya Sai Institute of Science and Technology from January 15 for providing employment to MBA students. The selection process was organised under the aegis of Infotel Communication Pvt Ltd (DNA Info). General Manager of the company Biju Simon and Manager, Human Resource (HR) Amit Chauhan were present in the selection process.

The training and placement advisor of Sri Satya Sai Institute of Science and Technology Anand Manjarkhede, training and placement officer Ravindra Gupta were also present. Around 162 students of MBA 3rd semester from various institutions of MBA, Indore, Bhopal and other places took part in the campus selection.

The officers of the Company informed in detailed to the students about job profile and company. After students were divided into various groups and group discussion was started. Around 51 students were selected for final interview. Total 23 students were selected finally.

Five students from Sri Satya Sai College of Science and Technology, 9 from VNS College (Bhopal), 4 from IPER (Bhopal), 1 from CRIM (Bhopal), 1 from SIRT (Bhopal), 1 from LNCT (Bhopal), 1 from Bhabha Engineering College (Bhopal), 1 from Bansal College were selected finally in the selection campus.

Central Chronicle Reference

The BPOs are calling Bharat

The BPOs are calling Bharat
MINI JOSEPH TEJASWI TIMES NEWS NETWORK , TNN 10 October 2009, 05:27am IST

College and an office job was 17-year-old Abhijit’s dream. But financial problems meant he had to join his father on the farm, helping to grow paddy Steep rentals and a high attrition rate in cities are why many BPOs are moving and sugarcane, collect fodder and sell milk. That became his life in the tiny hamlet of Baburayanakoppal, near Srirangapatna in Karnataka.

Until three months ago, when an abandoned rice mill in the village was renovated and became the office for a 100-seater BPO (business process outsourcing) unit.

Word was soon out in the village that there were jobs to be had. Though he neither spoke nor understood English, Abhijit decided to give it a shot. He applied, wrote a test, was taken in and trained. Today, he’s part of the Indian BPO army, once seen as an urban opportunity accessible only to educated, English-speaking boys and girls.

Abhijit’s employer B S Venugopal, a director of Mpro Solutions, says though the training takes time, it is worth the effort. ”We did not expect to find readily employable talent in rural areas. They are raw with no language or communication skills but eager to learn.”

A few weeks into his training, Abhijit tells TOI Crest in grammatically correct English, ”It’s not that a farmer’s life was a bad one, but farming doesn’t pay enough for a comfortable living. In my case, I had no education and didn’t think I could be anything other than a farmer.” Now as part of his job, he makes calls to prospective donors from a database seeking funds for NGOs. His salary is Rs 3,500 a month.

Abhijit isn’t the only one taking advantage of BPOs going rural. Even as many outsourcing firms based in cities put a freeze on hiring, many new units are opening up in villages and towns in the south.

Karnataka’s IT/BT secretary Ashok Kumar C Manoli says the companies are bringing technology and financial empowerment to rural youth. ”The idea is to create a rural BPO cluster , which can be integrated with similar projects across the country,” he says. ” We want to promote jobs for rural youth who have some computer knowledge and belong to small towns with a one lakh population. To start with, each of these centres will have 100 seats,” he adds.

Abhijit’s colleagues at Mpro – Mahesh, Jagadish , an orphan, Soumya and a dozen others – are also taking advantage of this economic transformation. But what will they do with the extra money? Abhijit wants to help his father buy more cows. His friends, too, want to help their parents out but they also want to buy mobile phones and bicycles.

”The initiative will change the economic fabric of the countryside,” Manoli says. BPOs will make youth in the hinterland financially independent as they did in the urban areas. They will have money for marriage, to pay off debts or buy sewing machines and cows. More importantly, it will stop the mass exodus of young people from villages to cities seeking employment, he says.

It is the cost of business in big cities – exorbitant rentals, steep wages, high attrition – that has many companies looking towards the village. Mpro Solutions is the first to become operational under the Karnataka government’s ambitious rural BPO scheme. The state plans to set up a hundred such units to create one lakh jobs in the next four years. A few weeks ago another centre was opened at Gundlupet, while two centres are being readied in Salgame and Shiggaon in Karnataka. Also in the pipeline are eight more in Sirsi, Huliyur, Chikbalapur, Hosadurga, Pavagada, Mundargi and Devadurg in rural Karnataka.

The state is rolling out the red carpet for those adventurous enough to go rural. It’s offering financial incentives of up to Rs 20 lakh and a per employee training incentive of Rs 10,000. Manoli says the response from entrepreneurs has been overwhelming. Infosys and Wipro, too, have shown interest.

Bangalore-based BPO company RuralShores, which already has a centre in Bagepalli, is in the process of entering rural areas in Tamil Nadu and Bihar. Xchanging, which acquired Cambridge Solutions, and Hinduja Global Solutions too are venturing into semi-urban places like Shimoga in Karnataka and Durgapur in West Bengal.

Other southern states too are developing business models to encourage private players to venture beyond the cities. Tamil Nadu already has rural BPO units and is planning another 100 rural units in the next few years.

Kerala is looking at a hub-and-spoke model. The government aims to set up 100 rural BPOs at the panchayat and district level in 14 districts over the next three years. The first rural BPOs have already come up in Perinad and Kadakkal in Kollam district.

Sai Seva Business Solutions, a rural BPO unit, was set up in Puttaparthi (the abode of Sathya Sai Baba), a couple of years ago by management students of the Sri Sathya Sai University. HDFC Bank outsources part of its work on data capture and profiling of new accounts to them. Tata Business Support Services has set up a BPO in Mithapur in Gujarat, near the manufacturing unit of Tata Chemicals.

A country-wide rural BPO drive is expected to create employment opportunities for millions of rural Indians, allowing them a share in the country’s $12-billion BPO pie.

Times Of India Reference

A Prayer Answered

Sathya Sai Baba Hands

Sathya Sai Baba Hands


A Prayer Answered

Hospitals may provide the facilities for treating a patient but in the ultimate analysis, it is God who really cures. There are innumerable instances of how Sathya Sai Baba intervenes, when the doctor feels that the situation is hopeless. Here is just one example, an episode narrated by Ravi Mariwala, which proves the point. Ravi Mariwala is one of Sathya Sai Baba‘s students; a graduate of the Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning. He holds a Master’s degree in Business Administration. The Super Speciality Hospital in Puttaparthi came into existence just at the time he was graduating. Many boys, especially with MBA degrees, volunteered to serve in the hospital, and Ravi was one of them. Ravi Mariwala operates the Heart-Lung machine, the vital instrument in cardiac surgery. This is what he had to say:

A patient being operated for a congenital defect was unable to recover heart function sufficiently, to come off the heart-lung machine and generate adequate systemic pressure. We tried everything but nothing seemed to work. Everyone was beginning to despair. We discussed the matter, rested the heart again, and added some more drugs. We only failed once more. We were absolutely helpless. It occurred to me that we had tried everything but prayer.

Prayer for a person not known to me? Would it work? I think that is why it did.

As I had been in the theatre for five hours already, I was briefly relieved by a colleague. I came into the corridor outside the theatre and stood silently for a minute, trying to recollect Sai’s face in my mind’s eye. I said a silent prayer for the patient’s recovery.

Immediately thereafter, I returned to the theatre. The situation had changed completely. The blood pressure had improved, and the heart had recovered! Strangely, no one knew how or why; I did not say anything to anyone.

The incident passed. The patient’s recovery was smooth. On the Sunday that followed, Swami came to me, created vibhuti, put it into my hands and lovingly said, “This is for the prayer that you said for that patient.” He then proceeded to describe the incident to others. Here was Sathya Sai Baba rewarding me for the miracle.

A Million Mother’s Love

A Million Mother’s Love
By Mr. Rakesh Menon

An alumnus of Sri Sathya Sai University, Mr. Rakesh Menon joined the Brindavan campus in the 1994 for his Bachelors in Commerce. After this he pursued his Masters in Business Administration in the Bharatiya University in the state of Tamil Nadu. He began his professional career in 2000 and since then has served in the banking industry in India as well as in other countries in various positions. Until recently, he was in the UK working as the Global Product Risk Manager in JP Morgan, Europe. Currently, he is the Vice President, Risk Management, in JP Morgan, India and is based in Bangalore. This is the adapted version of a conversation with him in the studios of Radio Sai for the radio series “Fleeting Moments…Lasting Memories” in July 2008.

Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai Baba


“God could not be everywhere, therefore He made mothers.” But I had the unique fortune of having the Lord Himself as my mother.

Enraptured by the Sublime Sai Ambience
I was blessed to be at Swami’s feet between the years 1994 to 1997. I was not a devotee before I joined Sathya Sai Baba’s University, neither was anybody in my family. But we had heard of Baba’s college as a unique institution which imparted human values. One of my uncles got me the application form and brought me to Puttaparthi, where I wrote the entrance examination. Swami, at that time, was in Kodai Kanal. Nevertheless, the general ambience of the ashram kindled in me the urge to learn more about Swami.

I was fascinated by the discipline in the ashram; how things happened in clockwork precision, right from the stroke of the bell at five o’ clock at dawn. It felt wonderful to be a part of the Omkaram, Suprabhatam and the Nagar Sankirtan, and feel those positive vibrations. Furthermore, everybody maintained silence irrespective of whether Swami was physically in Prashanthi Nilayam or not. That made a deep impact on me.

Thus, in the summer of 1994, when I stepped into the portals of the University at the Brindavan campus in Bangalore, I was yet to physically see Swami. Now I was not a devotee but already a Sai student. And I was very eagerly looking forward to the ‘Big Change’ that was to manifest in my life.

I hailed from a village in Kerala and now a higher education in a different sort of institution in the city of Bangalore really appealed to me. It seemed exciting, but I was not aware of what I was actually in for.

The first step to the change lay in my acceptance of Swami as God. But how could I accept someone as my guru and God, when I had not even seen Him? Wasn’t it foolhardy to invest my faith on a person, of whom I had only learnt from hearsay? So I decided to test Bhagavan!

Testing Divinity and What an Answer!
We were a group of three boys from the same place who wrote the entrance examination together. And all three of us had got through the test! There was one amongst us who had the habit of smoking. And as the hostel and ashram rules strictly forbade this habit, this boy would go out on the sly, unknown to anybody else, to take the vital puff!

I was aware of his furtive habits and so was the other boy. And we both advised him against persisting with his covert ways, knowing fully well that it might result in his expulsion from the institution altogether. But he remained adamant. Instead, he pointed a finger at a photograph of Sathya Sai Baba in the Sai Ramesh Hall and said, “Let Him say and I will stop.”

I looked at the hall; there were at least 5000 devotees seated there, waiting for Swami. It seemed Swami now had two more tasks to accomplish in such a massive crowd before two Doubting Thomases could accept His divinity. First, to censor the cigar boy and second, to trigger a Big Change in me.

Two days later, this boy got the chance to wave the arathi to Swami. I was sitting close to him. When the bhajans ended, Swami picked up the match box, lit the arathi, and told him in Tamil, “You said that if I ask you to stop smoking, you would do that.” He put the match box back into the boy’s shirt pocket and then continued as if nothing had ever happened. I was flabbergasted! Nobody else knew about that conversation except the three of us.

And I can never forget the expression on this boy’s face – of utter disbelief, shock and fear. Sathya Sai Baba’s words were also heard by the third boy. And we all looked at each other, astounded beyond words. In a crisp one-liner, the Omnipresent Lord had neatly packaged the lesson of a lifetime; it was powerful and unforgettable. This was my first direct experience of Swami’s omnipresence.

‘I will give him a thousand mothers’ love’ – Baba

More was to come. Nine days later, I received a letter from home. It was from my sister and the contents went thus, “We were very strict with you because we wanted you to grow up in the right way and become a respected individual. Now that you are far away, we do miss you.” My sister and I were very close to each other ever since my mother died when we were very young.

The letter made me homesick. And when, in the evening, there was a soul-stirring bhajan extolling Swami as Sai Ma (Mother Sai), I was reminded of my mother and was actually in tears. Soon, I was convulsing hard, with my head bent down I was trying to stem the cascade of sorrow that streamed down my face.

A few boys nudged me during the bhajans saying that Sathya Sai Baba was looking at me. But I did not believe them. The Trayee Session followed soon after the bhajans. These sessions are close interactive sessions wherein Swami would give discourses and move closely among us, interacting and sharing valuable insights peppered with humor. It was a great opportunity for us to listen and learn both from Satya Sai Baba and as well as from the elders.

That evening, I was sitting quite far away from the jhoola (the swing on which Swami generally sat). When Swami came, He looked around, searched among the boys, spotted me and then He asked me to come towards Him. Had I committed a grievous mistake I wondered, as I went up to Him?

But when I came closer, Swami pulled me towards Him, held me in a warm, loving embrace, and said, “This boy lost his mother. This boy lost his one mother but I will give him a thousand mothers’ love.” And then, He created a ring for me.

I was too overwhelmed, lost in His love, lost for words. And I was wondering how Swami knew my story; He was mentioning so many facts of my life to people nearby. This was the first time He spoke to me. That day, He touched my heart with His love. And I accepted Him as my Mother.

Sai’s Simply Amazing Care
His love was as tender as a mother yet strict like a father. And since I had no exposure to Swami and His teachings prior to my Brindavan years, He took upon Himself the task of ensuring that I was moulded into a Sai student. There were times when a Father’s guidance surged along with a Mother’s concern.

One such day in Brindavan, I was sitting for darshan. It was a cold winter morning. Satya SaiBaba walked by me, stared queerly at my face, and then went on His usual round of darshan among devotees, accepting letters and blessing them. I was perplexed, praying and hoping all the while that I had not upset Swami in any way, in thought, word or deed.

As I sat on after darshan, I was a troubled bundle of anxiety. And then I saw my commerce professor running towards me, holding something in his hand. As he came to me, he said, “Swami has sent this for you,” and handed me a Ponds cold cream! Apparently, Swami had noticed that I had dry skin because of the weather, so He sent the cream for me in His boundless concern.

Even as I stood there choked for words, I learnt from Swami that day something which I consciously try to apply in my daily life – attention to detail! Swami attended to thousands of devotees that day – collecting letters, conferring blessings, bestowing guidance – and yet He had borne in mind my dry skin and sent the cream! What was a parched epidermis in front of a million other pressing concerns for Swami? But that was the affection of the Divine Mother.

Surprise Gifts of Grace for Sisters
Another of my memorable experiences happened when I was in Kodai Kanal with Sathya Sai Baba. Kodai Kanal is a place where one can witness the parental aspect of Swami like nowhere else. I am reminded of an evening when Swami actually gave money to all of us, students, and asked us to go and buy something for ourselves. I went along with Prof. Anil Kumar to the shop. On the way I thought to myself that here I was with the Lord, pampered with His love, and absolutely taken care of, while my family back in my hometown was still facing life in its coldest.

So I thought I should buy something for them; that was the least I could do with the money Swami gave me. Therefore, as the professor shopped for something for his wife, I bought two pairs of earrings, one each for my two sisters. These were not very expensive, but I thought this was the minimum I could do.

So I had these earrings packed and put them in my shirt pocket. When I returned, Swami instantly started looking about as if He was searching for something. He then came to me and asked, “What did you buy?” and before I could reply, He put His hand in my shirt pocket and took out the earrings.

There was a look of dismay on His face when He saw those jewels, as if to say that they were not really of a good quality. And I was very disappointed, that I had not bought the right gifts for my sisters; that Swami had not approved of them. If Swami did not approve, then surely these are not really good, I thought to myself. That evening went by. That night even after everyone had retired, I was still ruminating over what had happened, and praying for my family.

At breakfast the next morning, Sathya SaiBaba went around looking to everyone’s needs like He did everyday. And when He came to me, He started waving His hand. Out came two identical sets of earrings from the Divine Palm! Swami said, “Those were not good. Give these to your sisters,” and humorously added, “I gave you two identical ones because they might fight.” That was one unforgettable instance of pure maternal affection that stands evergreen in my memories!

Success in the Corporate Space – The Sai Way
Time went on and I was not fortunate to secure an MBA admission in Sathya Sai Baba’s University and I was not sure about my future, because I was going to leave the protected shelter where I was so comfortable. This indeed was a huge transition and the following year I returned five times to Swami for support and strength which I desperately needed. And only Swami could have made that possible.

When I completed my MBA in another institution, I started my career with HSBC Bank. The corporate environment was cold, emotionless and unforgiving. Although the stress levels were critical, it was to percolate, at least through team work. But the fact remained that it is mostly every man to himself, so completely different from the brotherhood I enjoyed in Swami’s hostel. And in this new scenario, one didn’t have any choice but to dive within and look for inner reservoirs of courage and strength.

That is when I realized that whatever Swami has been teaching works in the corporate environment, that values gives one the growth. And practising Swami’s teachings did wonders for me – His directions on the right attitude towards work, dignity of labor, the right man management through leading by example, and practising what one preached.

These simple messages of Swami actually helped me move ahead in my career right from HSBC in India, to the Middle East with Standard Chartered Bank and Citibank where I was handling quality assurance and operation risk audit, to the UK where I am currently managing quality assurance for risk, globally, for JP Morgan.

A common thread runs through all these career positions. And it had to do with my values. Initially people didn’t understand why I behaved in a way which was totally different from the entire team of people around me. Nevertheless I clung on to the values I had imbibed as a student, especially the qualities of patience and perseverance. That helped me win the trust and credibility of the people I reported to, of my peers and my subordinates. I lead by example such that my subordinates were always willing to go an extra mile for me.

I remember an audit wherein my team worked round the clock to turn around a weak control situation into a strong order success. Even though there was no overtime, they worked day and night because they did not want to let me down at any cost.

The highlight was this: one of my subordinates came on the morning of his marriage to finish off a task! That was what I consider as success in a corporate environment. The challenge to manage the people and all the functions become more or less achievable.

Tackling different individuals, impressing them by being a silent worker and leading by example – that is something which I really learnt in Swami’s college and I still hold on to it. And when people ask me about my personality and the secret of my professional growth, I only talk about my University, the ashram in Puttaparthi and my Guru and my Mother, Sai. What I am today is only because of Sathya Sai Baba.

What words of gratitude can I have for my Swami, who, time and again, showered His love on me, treating me more like a son than a student? He has given me the love of a mother and the guidance of a father – a love that keeps me joyful and brings me back to Him, a love that gives me strength in my career and helps me face life and all its challenges. And I know that I never need to worry, for my Mother’s watchful eyes are always on me – caring, protecting, guiding, comforting and loving.

RadioSai Reference

Robotics – The Next Big Career Path

Robotics – The Next Big Career Path
Raj Singh Rathee

In India, the industry is expected to grow at a rate twice the global average.

Ever imagined that the bike you ride, the car you drive, the bus or train you travel in of even the clothes and groceries you buy has robots and robotics involved in it at some point or the other? Well it true. Robotics has grown far beyond the realm of fantasy, imagination and sci-fi. What we remember as robots being toys with blinking lights and mechanical sounds or as one would remember from the Hollywood blockbuster Robocop, are now left far behind. Robots and Robotics is far more firmly entrenched into our day to day life, though invisible and working in the background.

Let’s first define Robotics. Robotics is a field of engineering that deal with design and application of robots and the use of computer for their manipulation and processing.

How to be an expert?
Robotics being an inter-disciplinary course, students who have completed their graduation in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, instrumentation engineering or computer engineering with an interest in robotics and artificial intelligence can pursue a career in Robotics.

In India, there are few institutes imparting the state-of-the-art professional skills wherein people from industry and also the student community are trained on different aspects of robotics. Different types of courses from Basic Robot Programming to Expert Robot programming are being offered.

A course in Robotics trains and educates an individual in artificial intelligence, computer aided manufacturing, computer integrated manufacturing system, computational geometry, robot motion planning, digital electronics and micro-processors, robot manipulators.

Courses in Robotics are offered by leading institutes like IIT – Kanpur; National Institute of Technology – University of Hyderabad (M.Tech in Artificial Intelligence and Robotics); Kuka Training Centre – Pune; Jadavpur University – Kolkata; BITS – Pilani; Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning – Prasanthinilayam in Andhra Pradesh and PSG College of Technology – Coimbatore. These are a few names.

Avenues for you
The scope for a career in Robotics in India is tremendous and people can explore career opportunities in diversified sectors ranging from space research organisations to pure manufacturing companies. Apart from Automobile companies, which account for 70 per cent of Robotics applications in India, other sectors like foundry, food, logistics, healthcare and entertainment are also aggressively looking at adopting robots.

The big ones
Blue chip companies like Tata Motors, Hyundai Motors, Reliance Industries, Mahindra & Mahindra, Ashok Leyland, etc have separate designated departments to handle the programming and functioning of robotics.

Many small and medium enterprises in India are also warming up to the idea of investing in robotics to increase their global competitiveness.

The cases in point are the two prominent industries of the SME sector – Forging and Diamond. Robots contribute substantially towards rationalising cost-effective automation solutions in all areas of the forging industry. Whatever the application, be it loading and unloading of die-casting machines, deflashing presses or machining centres; spraying; finishing processes like milling, sawing and grinding, or handling hot, heavy forgings, these robots meet every need including applications in harsh ambient conditions. Trends suggest that internationally the diamond industry is moving towards very high precision workmanship. Robots play a critical role for this industry which is pegged at Rs. 60,000 crore.

Robots actually help SMEs to transform their competitiveness and deliver significantly enhanced levels of productivity, efficiency and profitability.

Robots are also used in the field of nuclear science, sea-exploration, servicing of transmission electric signals, designing of bio-medical equipments etc. A candidate having an M.E. degree in Robotics can get job opportunities in space research organisations like ISRO and also in industries which manufacture microchips.

Job opportunities also exist in Indian Institute of Technology for doing extensive research work in artificial intelligence.

Furthermore, The Indian Institute of Chemical Biology offers openings research fellowships in Robotics and Artificial Intelligence.

Internationally, a Robotics Engineer can get employment opportunities abroad to program, troubleshoot and maintain robots; Research fellowships are also available in research institute emphasising on humanoid robotics and computational neuroscience.

Companies like Intel recruit robotics and artificial intelligence specialists for microchip manufacturing. The Robotics Industrial Association in North America provides job opportunities in robot manufacturing and maintenance systems integration. NASA is the ultimate job destination for those interested in applying robotics to space science.
While Japan is often thought of as most adept at the use of robots, India now labelled as the new manufacturing hub of the world is emerging as the top market for Robots.

Future of Robotics:
Ever consider the Future of Robotics? What will it really be like? Did Science Fiction get it right, if not how close were they? Will robots be everywhere and involved in every aspect of life? Will robots eventually take over all the modern Factories; will robots be making robots too? Which sectors will we see robots excel in?

  • Robots in Commerce – Retail, Services, Fields
  • Robots in the home – Maids, Washing Car, Doing Chores, Mowing the Lawn
  • Robots in Security – Guards, Guard Dogs, Bomb Sniffers, Bomb Squads
  • Robots to the Rescue – FEMA, Earthquake, Hurricanes, Wild Fires
  • Robots for the Weather and Environment – Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
  • Robots in Transportation – Light Rail, Cars, Aircraft
  • Robots in Distribution – Trains, Warehouses
  • Robotic Androids – Assistants, Mentors, Educators
  • Robots and Artificial Intelligence – Thinking Machines and Systems
  • Robots in the Military – Smart Munitions, Net-Centric Systems, UAVs

With the global robotic industry pegged at $17.6 billion this industry is expected to take rapid growth strides in the future.

In India, the industry is expected to grow at two to two-and-a-half times the global average with robots worth about Rs 3500 crore already being sold so far. If working with computers and mechanics sounds interesting and if you have science and math skills, then pursuing a career in Robotics might be just right for you. If you like to build new things and fiddle around with electronic gadgets then consider robotics as a career option.

The exponential growth of robots in India is fuelling the demand for skilled manpower that can design, build, operate and repair robots and robotic machines. Robotics is now emerging as the new hot destination where more and more graduates are establishing lucrative careers.

Deccan Herald Reference

Monument To Music

Monument To Music
by Aruna Chandraraju

From the window above, the strains of a soothing raga, and the rhythmic beats of a mridangam float down to us. We pause on the steps leading to Sathya Sai Baba Mirpuri College of Music in Prashanti Nilyam to take a good look at the Saraswathi statue that fronts this truly unique college.

You might wonder what is unique about a music college considering India abounds in them. This college not only offers high-grade education free of cost but also a zero-cost all-inclusive residential facility. Attached to it is an enormous music museum with strikingly unusual architecture and a collection of nearly 300 musical instruments from across the world. The Sathya Sai Mirpuri College of Music also has eminent Indian musicians like Shivkumar Sharma, Yella Venkateswara Rao, Hariharan, L. Subramaniam, and Neyveli Santanagopalan visiting and holding interactive sessions with students. Moreover, the students get to listen regularly to legends in Indian classical and film music who frequent the Sai Ashram and perform there.

We are ushered inside and walked through the building. The classrooms are spacious, airy, and impeccably clean. The library has an impressive collection of nearly 4000 music-related books and 400 CDs and audio cassettes, with new additions every month.

The college offers three courses each in Hindustani and Carnatic streams of music, and teaches vocal and instrumental music including veena, mridangam, sitar and tabla.

It even has classes for dying folk arts like Burrakatha. There is a two-year foundation course (Abhyaasa Gaana), three-year diploma course (Vidya Praveena), and one-year post-diploma Kalapoorna course.

The curriculum was designed by stalwarts like Bhimsen Joshi, Nookala Chinna Satyanarayana and Yella Venkateswara Rao, and professors of music from other universities.

The museum has a giant tabla alongside and its façade has two-storey high tamburas and guitars for pillars, while an enormous trumpet forms another design element. Within is a visual and acoustic treat for the music connoisseur — nearly 300 stringed, percussion and wind instruments from Africa, South-east Asia and Arabic countries, including rare specimens, displayed in a large, well-lit hall.

Some of the smaller instruments are mounted on the wall alongside pictures of the spiritual guru Sathya Sai Baba, who is Founder-Chancellor of the university which runs this college. There are bigger instruments at floor-level like a giant veena, mridangam and guitar, all perfectly proportioned and tuned.

For details, contact Sathya Sai Mirpuri College of Music, Sri Sathya Sai University, Prashanti Nilayam, Andhra Pradesh. Tel: (08555) 287 239; 289 050.

The Hindu Reference

Economic Crisis – Ethics and the World Of Finance

Economic Crisis – Ethics and the World Of Finance

Meet on ethics and finance from today
Express News Service
First Published : 28 Aug 2009 03:39:00 AM IST
Last Updated : 28 Aug 2009 02:38:05 PM IST

ANANTAPUR: A two-day high profile conference on Ethics and the World of Finance will be held at Sri Sathya Sai University in Puttaparthi on August 28 and 29. For the conference, the university has brought together the top echelons of the world of finance and a number of reputed economists.

The conference will be inaugurated by Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba Friday morning at the university auditorium.

RBI Governor Duvvuri Subba Rao will deliver the keynote address.

Former RBI governor YV Reddy has also been invited to deliver a lecture.

Chairmen and chief executives of nearly 25 commercial banks, insurance companies and several regulatory bodies will participate in the conference.

The deliberations will be interactive as panel discussions. The plenary session at the end of the conference will outline a roadmap for financial institutions, regulatory authorities and other investment institutions to follow so as to ensure sustainable and stable economic growth of the country.

Four themes which are on the agenda include, the quintessence of the human values relevant to the world of finance, functioning of the financial institutions and the new complexities which have arisen in the present world of globalisation, role of the government and regulatory agencies and the need for a value oriented educational process, which produces business leaders with appropriate value orientation for tomorrow’s world.

The organisers of the conference believe that a good part of the problem is due to declining moral standards in all spheres of economic and social life.

The most appropriate place for holding such a conference is indeed Sri Sathya Sai University, which lays primary emphasis on inculcation of human values without compromising on excellence in academic pursuit. The university has, over a short period of its existence, become a role model for other varsities by effectively integrating the two objectives of education, inculcation of values and enhancement of capabilities.

The unique educational experiment started by Sri Sathya Sai Baba as part of His Divine Mission has indeed proved to be a great success, according to Viswanath Pandit, Vice-Chancellor of Sri Sathya Sai University.

Express Buzz Reference

Global crisis led to breakdown of trust in fin system: RBI
Press Trust of India / Puttaparthi /ap August 28, 2009, 17:39 IST

Reserve Bank Governor D Subbarao today said the ongoing global crisis has resulted in a massive breakdown of trust in the financial system and that the study of economics could lose its value base.

“What the crisis has done is to cause a massive breakdown of trust: trust in the financial system, in bankers, in business, business leaders, investment advisers, credit rating agencies, politicians, media and in globalisation,” he said at a conference on ‘Ethics and the World of Finance’ here.

Saying that current financial crisis has called into question the ethical foundation of the financial world, the Governor at Sri Sathya Sai University said the crisis has exposed an issue of moral hazard in the banking system.

“…Something that has come to be called privatisation of profit and socialisation of costs,” he said.

The governments can hardly afford to have large institutions fail as they would be bailed out at tax payers expense, he added.

The ‘too big to fail’ syndrome enables financial institutions to take risks a soap maker cannot take, he said.

The crisis, he said, has triggered a soul searching debate on whether the malaise in the financial sector could be a result of the flaws in the direction that economics, as an academic discipline, has taken over the years.

“I have raised the issue of economics, as an academic discipline, losing its value base, and conjectured if that could be at the root of the malaise in the financial sector,” he said. Subbarao said the ethical content of economics got eroded over the centuries as economics tried to move from being a value based social science to a value free exact science.

“The mathematical abstractions got carried too far and in the process economics lost its link with real life situations that it was expected to study and analyse,” he said.

Though there is no evidence to show that people in the financial sector are inherently less ethical, given the larger temptation and more opportunities there could be greater incidence of unethical behaviour in the sector, he said.

“Banks and financial institutions have a greater responsibility of being conscious of the obligation they have of not jeopardizing the larger public interest,” he said.

Further, quoting economist John Stuart Mill, he said that “if we make men honest, good and decent, then they will make themselves honest, good and decent engineers, doctors and teachers, and may I add, financial sector professionals.”

Business Standard Reference