Sathya Sai Baba to visit Shimla on April 15

Sathya Sai Baba To Visit Shimla

Sathya Sai Baba To Visit Shimla


Sathya Sai Baba to visit Shimla on April 15

Shimla: Spiritual guru Sri Sathya Sai Baba of Puttaparthi will be in Shimla on Thursday (April 15) to deliver sermons to his disciples. “Sri Sathya Sai Baba is reaching Shimla on April 15 for his three-day sojourn. He will arrive at the Shimla airport at 10.30 am, from where he will reach Pujarali on the outskirts of Shimla by road,” president of the Sri Sathya Sai Trust, Himachal Pradesh, Shyam Sunder told HimVani.

He said more than 10,000 devotees have been working day and night to make arrangements for the spiritual guru’s visit. “Special arrangements have been made to accommodate more than 100,000 people on both the days,” he added. This would be the third visit of Sri Sathya Sai Baba to Shimla. Earlier, he visited the town in 1973 and 1975.

HimVani Reference

Thoughts For A Pious Campus

Thoughts For A Pious Campus
By Mike Boylan | February 19, 2010

Sathya Sai Baba is a religious guru from India who has been sharing his spiritual guidance for over 50 years.

He claims to be the reincarnate of 19th Century miracle worker Sai Baba of Shirdi and will be reborn for the third and last time as Prema Sai Baba. His devotees accept this claim. There have been hundreds of contemporaneous eyewitness accounts of the many miracles Sai Baba has performed, including materializing rainbows and portraits of Jesus with the wave of his hand, healing the sick and many others. Even some who reject his divinity, accept the validity of these miracles.

He claims all the prayers in the world go through him, the first and only true avatar. While most Sai Baba devotees are natives of southern India and are of Hindu orientation, he has converted many non-Hindus from Europe and even the United States.

These accounts are quite compelling. If one has doubts, they can take comfort in knowing there are more than one million Sai Baba devotees. The $1,200 plane ticket is a small price to pay for the privilege of being in the presence of a true avatar.

However, it is not the man, but rather his obscurity and irrelevance to the acclaimed monotheisms of our contemporary world that is significant.

Not ever hearing of Sai Baba is not difficult to understand. This is because anytime someone espouses their devotion to Sai Baba with any conviction, something very natural occurs: people stop listening. These people are not taken seriously, nor are they respected by anyone who warrants reciprocation of these courtesies. In other words, these ideas naturally flow to the margins of our society. Nobody is in outrage over this.

But this consensus contradicts the manner in which we revere and uphold widely practiced religions. The compelling firsthand accounts of Sai Baba’s divinity is leaving members of other faiths perfectly unstirred. They are not losing sleep over whether they have wasted their lives worshipping false prophets and gods. Christians, for example, are happily content with their faith in first century miracles that were not written until decades after Jesus’ death, nor were they even firsthand accounts; two things many biblical scholars have agreed on.

The standards we hold for religious belief indicate that Sai Baba devotees are not merely as worthy, but in fact more worthy of social acceptance than those who presuppose the divinity of certain books, yet, this is not the case.

There appears to be no identifiable or intelligible criterion for qualifying religions belief or divine intervention. What follows from this is that all beliefs should be accepted equally and without prejudice in order to avoid arbitrary favoritism. The logical end to this proposition is no claim can be justifiably rejected, yet, this is not the present state of our discourse. In both casual and professional conversations, we often do not hesitate to unequivocally reject claims found to be nonsensical.

If simply being useful and charitable should suffice toleration for beliefs, our kinship with Hamas, the militant Islamic political organization in Palestine, should be more transparent, for they are as committed to terror and Jihad as they are to charitable works for the thousands of impoverished and indigent Palestinians. Both Hamas and leading monotheisms partake in similar endeavors: acquiring authority over other people’s lives guised as angelic mercy, faith and humility, all in the name of God.

A distressing reality is this enigmatic social dysfunction and hypocrisy stem from a premise – belief in possessing absolute knowledge of God’s will – that is utterly deranged. Sathaya Sai Baba isn’t afforded the time of day from just about every corner of the world, yet the sustenance of divine proclamations from the Iron and middle ages are closely supervised and protected from the heresy and apostasy that is slowly infiltrating the masses. Is there anyone who sees a problem with this?

Collegian Reference

Love & Liberation

Sathya Sai Baba - Love And Liberation

Sathya Sai Baba - Love And Liberation


Love & Liberation

“True and effective forgiveness includes forgetting, but the memory of some wrong done may exist somewhere in the mind. It is not as easy as cleaning a word from a slate, or erasing it from a piece of paper,” says Mr. Howard Murphet in the final chapter of his book “Sai Inner Views.” He goes on to beautifully explain the intimate connection between forgiveness, healing, love and finally, liberation.

Even though love is perhaps the most common four lettered word and an emotion that is alien to none on this planet, at the same time, only a handful have understood its truest form and experienced the true bliss arising there from. It is to help us in understanding this seemingly simple but extremely profound idea that can change our life dramatically from dust to diamond, that we have this article for you.

The author, Mr. Howard Murphet, was an Australian journalist who came to Bhagavan Baba in 1964, and later authored many books on Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba, the most popular of them being “Sai Baba: Man of Miracles”. He wrote many volumes after that like “Sai Baba: Avatar”, “Sai Baba : Invitation to Glory”, “When the Road Ends”, and so on. The book “Sai Inner Views” from which the present article is an extract was composed by him when he was in his nineties and had lost his eye-sight, but the insight he has left behind for humanity is immense and precious, which you will perceive as you read on.

“Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.” These well-known words from the Lord’s Prayer have a deeper implication than it may at first appear. In His mission on earth, Jesus showed that there was a very close connection between the forgiveness of trespass, or sin, and the healing of diseases. After healing somebody, He would say, “Your sins are forgiven. Now go your way and sin no more.”

The Need to Forgive
At the healing centre of a church I know in Australia, the sick person is told by the Christian priest in charge that before any healing can be accomplished, the patient must ask God for forgiveness and prior to that he must forgive anybody who he thinks has sinned against him.

This forgiving of those who have trespassed against him will, no doubt, involve a search back through many years to unearth anyone against whom he may still feel some resentment, hidden anger or any other signs of non-forgiveness. Having located the person against whom he holds any of these negative emotions, he must declare sincerely in his heart and mind that he truly forgives him. But such a declaration of forgiveness, if he also says in his mind, “But I cannot forget”, is not true forgiveness.

True and effective forgiveness, includes forgetting, but the memory of some wrong done may exist somewhere in the mind. It is not as easy as cleaning a word from a slate, or erasing it from a piece of paper. In forgiving those who have trespassed against us, we must effectively forget it, by never again dwelling on the wrongs we think have been done against us. Until this is accomplished sincerely, we cannot expect the Divine One to forgive our trespasses or sins.

Some patients ask, “Does this mean that God is unable to forgive us until we have truly forgiven all those who have trespassed against us, or is it that He will not?” We must remember that God is omnipotent and can therefore do anything He wills to do. Because as well as being omnipotent, He is also omniscient and compassionate, He will answer any prayer that does not go against the ultimate spiritual welfare of the one who prays. Why then this requirement that we must forgive before we are forgiven? And why is the whole process of forgiving and being forgiven essential before the truly effective healing of a person’s disease?

Understanding True Love
To understand this, we must take a penetrating look into that which we know as divine, unconditional love. We must be careful not to confuse such a love with the so-called romantic love that comes as a result of Cupid’s irresponsible arrow-shooting. This love is an emotional state that keeps a man and a woman in a state of constant agitation, a state of great joy and ecstasy followed by misery and sorrow. Even so, romantic love between man and woman may be an echo of the real thing because it does bring some moments, a few flashes of the great bliss that lies above the passing joys and pains. Thus, in a sense, it is a promise of the true love that will someday come.

Perhaps, the best echo in man and in other animals of the divine love, for which we are forever searching, is what we call mother-love. This, at its best, is completely unselfish, giving-and-forgiving. It demands no return in its purest state, yet like God Himself, the mother does enjoy a response of love for love. Mother-love is certainly brave, even warrior-like in its protectiveness of its offspring. I have seen mother geese attack big farm horses that have strayed too close to the young goslings. The mother goose will face almost any danger to shield her young from harm.

When I was a boy I thought that mother magpies went a bit too far in this. If I inadvertently came too close to a tree where the baby magpies were being hatched out of their shells in some high-up nest, I was attacked by mother magpie from the air. Other birds, including plovers, took the same protective, aggressive action against boys whom they thought were likely to steal their eggs. Such love in human beings is equally strong and lasts longer. It can, however, in time become tainted. It may become more attachment than love, sprouting selfish tentacles to contaminate the original selfless love of the mother.

Is it possible, we wonder, to find somewhere that pure selfless never-changing love that forgives and gives, and asks nothing in return? Yes, it is possible to find and experience that love. First, let us try to understand something of what it is. As the great seer-poet Dante said, “Love is the energy that moves the Sun and the other stars.” In fact, it is the primal power that created the universe and holds it together as one unit or system. It could be called the great cosmic magnet that keeps the wheels of the cosmos turning. As Swami says, God is Love and the energy He emanated in creating the universe, the premier energy, the primal energy to begin creation and hold it together, is love.

In Sanskrit, this pure love of God is called prema, and in the fullness of time, this divine magnet which we call love draws all things back into conscious oneness with the great Creator. Those, who have eyes to see, witness its reality around them as the inner-truth of the one within the many. Their eyes may fill with tears as their inner-vision apprehends this essence of divine oneness in the beauty of a flower, or a cloud, or the words of a poem. But, above and beyond these occasional flashes of the great truth, there is a way to experience the flow within one’s being of this primal prema, or divine love. That is, to come within the aura, or the influence, of one who may be called living divinity, for such a one is a veritable fountain of love.

Sri Sathya Sai Baba – Living Avatar of Love
The greatest of these in my own experience is the living Avatar, Sri Sathya Sai Baba. Undoubtedly, there are others on earth today who can, to some degree, as Baba does in full measure, open the human heart to release the flow of love that is waiting there. It is the wonderful influence of such Godmen that finds and opens the buried spring of love, pure unconditional love, that is hidden in every person’s heart.

But, of course, not everybody who has set his feet on the spiritual path will have the good fortune of meeting one of these divine surgeons of the spiritual heart who will bring forth the flow of love. Perhaps, it is safe to say that the majority will not. Therefore, there must, surely be some other way. Yes, there are several. For one, a deep study of the philosophy concerning the reality and truth of divine love is of great help. We must understand that this prema is the primary force within the universe and is the great magnet that holds all in oneness, finally bringing all into our realisation of this unity with its attendant felicity and never-ending yet ever-changing bliss.

With this understanding of the mind and even with slight glimpses, passing experiences of the divine love in our hearts, we will do all we can to practise and promote this important power of love in our lives. How do we do that? As the old French bishop said to the young priest, about this puzzling question, “You learn to walk by walking, you learn to ride a bicycle by riding one. You learn to swim by getting in the water and trying until you learn. There are many things you must learn just by doing them, and loving is one. You learn to love by loving. The more you practise loving, the more love you will develop, until in the end you will be a master in the art of loving.”

Practising the Presence of Love
That is the key. Realise that it is the most important thing in your life and begin to practise it on your fellow-men. Start with those who are easy to love. In the end you will be loving those to whom you are indifferent, and eventually even hate will be replaced by love. Furthermore, this trickle of love for our fellow-men can grow into a full stream through heart-felt worship and devotion to one of the princes of love no longer in the body. Two such are Christ and Krishna. Calling on their hallowed names and picturing their forms will help release the pent-up divine love in the human heart.

Finally, we should be aware that, in our own individual divine plan to love not only all of humanity but all of life, forgiveness is the greatest builder of love. Forgiving others and being forgiven by God repairs the broken channels through which the unifying and healing streams of love are meant to flow. In this divine business of forgiving there is one aspect that we should try to understand and remember. You may have heard people say that it is important to forgive ourselves. That is true but who forgives whom in ourselves? The social science of psychology divides us into many different parts, the number and names of these depending on the particular system of psychology we study.

Divine science divides the human being into two main parts. These are, the lower self, usually called the ego, and the high Self, being synonymous with the God within. These two inhabit the one human body. An interesting analogy is shown in the Indian story about two birds which live in the same tree. One has his nest and his existence on the lower branches. He is a very busy little bird, following his instinctive life of food-gathering, mating and fighting the enemies who want to usurp his territory.

Sometimes he is happy, at times he is angry and sometimes tragically sad. He catches in his active lifestyle occasional glimpses of another bird living in the thick branches of the tree above him. This bird of the shining plumage seems to live a very calm and contented life, never fighting with other birds over territory or morsels of food. Though in the same tree, this ‘top bird’ seems to live in a different world. His songs are full of joy, flowing from him, naturally. In time, the ‘lower bird’, by comparison, sees his own little life as a continual struggle on the treadmill of desires. He longs to be like the shining bird, the calm, beautiful, wise bird on the lofty branches.

The wise bird sees all that his little brother on the lower branches is doing. He knows that his brother on the lower branches will, in the course of time, learn the vital lessons that will make him discard his many agitating desires and start to climb the branches where he can live the life of the higher bird, the life of calmness and peace, the life of light and joy. The high bird will then do all he can to help his lower brother upward, until in love they finally merge as one. The busy bird on the lower branch represents the human lower self or ego, while the bird in the upper branch symbolises our higher Self, our true divine Self.

Being Forgiven by God
In the question of forgiving, what is known as forgiving ourselves must mean the divine Self, who has no sin, but witnesses the misdemeanours, the trespasses, the foolish errors of the little thoughtless desire-filled ego, must be the forgiver of the sins of the ego. So it is that the sinful ego must be forgiven by the divine Self so that forgiving ourselves is the same as being forgiven by God. Our inner God is no different from the one great eternal God who is omnipresent in the universe. In brief, to be forgiven by God is the same as forgiving ourselves.

The inner God forgives the erring ego. It is clear, then, that this process of forgiving and being forgiven, mending as it does the shattered truth of oneness, is one of the most important roads to the state of living in universal love. This is not far from, and may itself be, the liberation we seek. It is said that when an individual reaches this state of enlightenment, or liberation from the bondage of all earthly desires, two paths lie open to him. One is that he may rest in Nirvana, which means being merged with the Divine Absolute for eternity. Otherwise, through the power of the divine love that is now his very being, he may help to do the work of God while merged in Him. That is, he may help his brothers and sisters on earth to mend the broken bridges that hold them in the sorrows of mortal existence, thus bringing them to the truth and joy that he has found.

The first way could be called the Nirvana of rest, and the second the Nirvana of divine action. To attempt to describe what this state of Nirvana or liberation is would be an attempt to describe the indescribable. But Paramahansa Yogananda has given a concept of this that is worthy of our contemplation. What he says, in paraphrase, is that in time we become tired of everything, even pleasure and happiness.

Even from the high heavens of joy, men and gods come back to earth to seek the spring-board that will take them beyond the high heavens, in other words, to unity with God or Nirvana. This, he says, is “ever-changing, ever-new, ever-lasting bliss”. It is a joy, though eternal, is ever new. This, I feel, is a worthwhile attempt to explain the inexplicable.

“When I wake in the morning thy love is there,
Like the golden sunrise in clear mountain air,
And, sheltered all day in thy aura of blue,
I rest in the beauty and love of you.
There’s a silent presence, whatever I do,
Lighting the hours as the day wears through.
Come nearer and nearer, great Lord divine,
Till thy being is mine and mine is thine,
Till this ego can really cease to be,
And I am forever one with thee.
Then, though atoms burst and mountains fall,
No earthly disasters can matter at all,
And even the dark of the cosmic night
Shall shine with thy love in eternal light.”

Reference

How Sai Baba Gave Radhakrishna A New Lease Of Life

Sathya Sai Baba

Sathya Sai Baba


How Sathya Sai Baba Gave Radhakrishna A New Lease Of Life

Mr. Howard Murphet narrates this amazing episode in his book “Sai Baba:Man of Miracles”:

There happened in the latter part of 1953 an event almost as dramatic in its way as Christ’s raising of Lazarus from the dead. I heard of it from a number of people, including the man most closely concerned, the “Lazarus” of the case, Mr. V. Radhakrishna. Then I finally had the facts carefully presented by Mr. Radhakrishna’s daughter, Vijaya, who was an eyewitness, and who wrote down the details at the time of the happening in the diary she has always kept of her experiences with Sathya Sai Baba. While relating the experience to me she had her diary before her.

Mr. Y. Radhakrishna, who was an industrialist and a well-known citizen in Kuppam, Andhra Pradesh, was about sixty years of age when in 1953 he paid a visit to Puttaparthi. With him on this occasion went his wife, his daughter Vijaya and the latter’s husband Mr. K. S. Hemchand.

Vijaya was about eighteen and had not been long married. Her father, she told me, was at the time suffering from gastric ulcers, with various complications. He was really in a very bad way, and one of his reasons for visiting the ashram was the hope that he might get relief from his frightful suffering. He had known Baba for some time.

The great religious festival of Dasara was on, and a good number of people were visiting Puttaparthi. Mr.Radhakrishna was given a room in the same building where Swami lived, and spent all his time on his bed there. Once when Baba came to visit him, Radha Krishna said that he would prefer to die rather than go on suffering the way he was. Swami simply laughed at this, and made no promise of either healing him or letting him die.

One evening Radhakrishna went into a coma and his breathing was that of a dying man. Alarmed, the wife dashed off to see Swami. Swami came to the room, looked at the patient and said, “Don’t worry. Everything will be all right,” and left.

On the next day the patient was still unconscious. Mr. K. S. Hemchand, the son-in-law, brought a male nurse of the district who, after failing to find any pulse and making other examinations, gave his opinion that Mr. Radhakrishna was near death that there was no possibility of saving him. So, about an hour after this, the patient became very cold. The three anxious relatives heard what they thought was the ‘death rattle’ in his throat and watched him turning blue and stiff.

Vijaya and her mother went to see Baba who was at the time upstairs in His dining room. When they told Him that Radhakrishna seemed to be dead. He laughed and walked away to His bedroom. Vijaya and her mother returned to the room of the ‘dead’ man and waited.

After a while, Swami came in and looked at the body, but went away again without saying or doing any thing. That was on the evening of the second day since Mr. Radhakrishna had become unconscious. The whole of the next night passed while the three stayed awake and anxiously watched for any signs of life returning. There were no signs. Yet they still had faith that Baba would some how or other, in His own way, save Radhakrishna, for had He not said that everything would be all right?

On the morning of the third day the body was more than ever like a corpse – dark, cold, quite stiff and beginning to smell. Other people who came to see and sympathise told Mrs. Radhakrishna that she should have the corpse removed from the ashram. But she replied, “Not unless Swami orders it.” Some even went to Baba and suggested that, as the man was dead and the body smelling of decomposition, it should either be sent back to Kuppam or cremated at Puttaparti. Swami simply replied, “We’ll see.”

When Mrs. Radhakrishna went upstairs again – to tell Baba what people were saying to her, and ask Him what she must do, He answered: “Do not listen to them, and have no fear; I am here.” Then He said that He would come down to see her husband soon.

She went downstairs again and waited, with her daughter and son-in-law by the body. The minutes dragged by – an hour passed – but Swami did not come. Then, when they were beginning to despair entirely, the door opened and there stood Baba in His red robe, copious hair, and shining smile. It was then about half past two in the afternoon of the third day.

Mrs. Radhakrishna went towards Baba and burst into tears. Vijaya too began to cry. They were like Martha and Mary, the sisters of Lazarus, weeping before their Lord who, they thought, had come too late.

Gently, Baba asked the tearful women and sorrowful Mr. Hemchand to leave the room. As they left, He closed the door behind them. They do not know – no man knows – what happened in that room where there were only Swami and the ‘dead’ man. But after a few minutes Baba opened the door and beckoned the waiting ones in.

There, on the bed, Radhakrishna was looking up at them and smiling! Amazingly, the stiffness of death had vanished and his natural colour was returning. Baba went over, stroked the patient’s head and said to him, “Talk to them, they’re worried.”

“Why worried?” asked Radhakrishna, puzzled. “I’m all right. You are here.”

Swami turned to the wife: “I have given your husband back to you,” He said. “Now get him a hot drink.”

When she brought it, Swami Himself fed it to Radhakrishna slowly with a spoon. For another half an hour He remained there, strengthening the man He had “raised”. Then He blessed the whole family, placing His hand on Mrs. Radhakrishna’s head, and left the room.

Next day the patient was strong enough to walk to Bhajan. On the third day he wrote a seven-page letter to one of his daughters who was abroad in Italy. The family stayed a few more days at Prasanthi Nilayam, then with Baba’s permission returned to their home in Kuppam. The bad gastric ulcers and complications had vanished forever.

When I spoke to Mr. Radhakrishna himself about the experience I asked if he had any memories at all of the time he was unconscious and to all appearances dead. He replied, “No. When I became conscious again I thought at first that it was just the same day. Later they told me it had been three days I was unconscious, that I was ‘dead’ and actually starting to stink. But Swami can do anything he wishes. He is God.”

Reference: “Sai Baba: Man of Miracles” by Mr. Howard Murphet.
Publisher: Macmillan India Limited, 1972. This episode is also recorded in the book “Anyatha Sharanam Nasthi – Other Than You Refuge There Is None” written by Mr. Radhakrishna’s daughter, Smt. Vijaya Kumari.